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Tesla Model 3

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It's recommended to do this for about 20 minutes prior to leaving.

 

Unless you have the EVSE plugged into 240, it can't keep up with the increased load.

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Well, I have taken the leap.  I have a reservation on a Model 3, but decided to get a Model S.  Hopefully will have it in the next week or two.  I bought a certified pre owned one that's 3 years old.  They give you remaining battery and drive unit warranty (which will be 5 years left and unlimited miles), and 4 years, 50,000 mile bumper to bumper warranty (which is the same warranty as their new cars).  I am trading in both my jeep and challenger.  This is the car I really wanted, and being that the cpo's run roughly half or slightly more than half the cost of a new one, I decided to go for it.  With the rear facing seats, I can now fit all 4 kids in the car at the same time, which gives us more flexibility.  Plus it's even more fun to drive than my challenger (which I truly love).  I just got my charger installed in the garage for it yesterday.  I am glad i can finally give the big "F@CK YOU" to big oil.  I still can't wait for the model 3 to come out, to hopefully really start to shift the paradigm.  

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Congratulation. I'm sure it will be a fun experience.

 

My sister just bought a new Escape, but forgo the hybrid option as not worthy. Her daughter is big on alternative energy and has a position in university to teach such stuff. Her daughter really hyped the hybrid option for the earlier car purchases. My sister was excited with the new technology and talked of the advantages. She must have changed her mind with the latest purchase. 

 

Per my experience Elon Musk battery factory was a mistake. Consider the division of his much needed resources, talent, concentration, etc. He still has a startup company and needs to focus on auto car technology, quality, and cost. He needs to chose. Same for the Solar City purchase. This tells me, he is in love with the technology. Very bad to be loaded with such bias. Meaning the market demands and will support those companies that solve their problems or meet their needs. His market niche seems to be (like yourself) those people in love with the technology. This is a powerful marketing position to be in for sure, but not one he owns. Meaning traditional car companies with top tier talent and a proven record of making quality products can take that away.  So, it appears to me, he is fully aware of the situation. That he is on a slippery slope of competition and his actions are continually looking for a another advantage or a quiet port to sail into to avoid the storm of open market competition.

 

When he first started the business, he was able to do so, by tapping into the ultra low cost Chinese manufacturing sector. It was a good example of what is possible with modern day low cost CAD/CAM and engineering software. China offers extremely low startup costs for parts. Musk pulled off a successful battery car market intro per his ability to attract publicity and enthusiasm. He sold the cars to elite California market and earned much needed stock market purchases. His technology team was equally enthused and talented. This is his forte, to motivate and focus the team to produce a better and original product. It appears to me his stardom may be his Achilles Heel as he appears to desire to much attention and bored with the details. I haven't seen new technology, just clever use of existing. This is alright and will keep costs down and may be the only way a startup can compete, just the company will always need to be first upon maximizing the utilization of existing technology. Dangerous per quality control. One big screw up will destroy the companies reputation. Also, it may be that Musk read the tea leaves and thinks the lithium battery will be the control supply to destroy competition. This is how petrol worked to destroy competition and achieve wealth. The reason ethanol is such a threat. Lithium and battery technology appear to have much larger potential to throttle competition to the few. Can you imagine if a few International Corporations colluding to screw the market? My guess, the door is wide open.     

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My sister just bought a new Escape, but forgo the hybrid option as not worthy​:

 

Just a reminder, Ford's Escape does not currently have a hybrid option.  It was last offered in 2012 in limited numbers.  It is rumored to return for the 2018/19 model year.

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Ford's Escape does not currently have a hybrid option.  It was last offered in 2012 in limited numbers.  It is rumored to return for the 2018/19 model year.

 

Wow, that's a long way away in car years, considering how the next 7 years is supposed to bring more changes than the last 50 according to GM's CEO.

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The history of Ford's Escape is interesting. They were the first with a hybrid SUV. Ford licensed the Toyota Prius technology. Best sales year for the hybrid was '07 at 21,386. Worst was '12 at 1,441. Their currently transitioned from hybrid to EccoBoost technology. The boost technology with start stop 23/30 mpg at $1,300 option cost. Highest tow rating with this engine. 

 

When one reviews a vehicle fuel savings, achieving over 20 saves a lot of money and going to 30 is attractive. After 30 mpg, not much savings to justify expensive technology or cost. Consumers more interested in power, quiet, quality, appearance, convenience, etc. This is why even full hybrid is not attractive to majority of car owners. Analysis expect mild hybrid and below technology will reign popular with motorist per value for the foreseeable future.  This is why ethanol value to decrease emissions to the environment is wholly underrated. The here, now, available, and ease of use.  

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The Ford Escape did not exactly copy the Pirus via license agreement.  Ford developed their own software and the hardware was not the same either.   The platform was the same but that can be said for all car makers with their internal combustion engine.   The biggest hangup was the battery pack and electronic transmission came from Japan.  The Fusion hybrid was introduced and also took away the limited number of parts that were available.   Toyota also purchased a portion of battery company that own the production of the Ford Escape hybrid battery pack.   What many people don't realize that Ford also sold/trade diesel technology and the Ford Explorer (yes you read that correctly) hybrid technology (dual battery packs with one to power the rear wheels) to Toyota as part of the license agreement.

 

Ford's CEO (Mark Fields) announce the introduction of eight(?) new hybrid models in the next few years.  One is going to the F150 rear drive hybrid.   IT is unknown at this time exactly what electrical range will be offered on these vehicles but it is rumored to be 40 miles.    I would hope they offer several battery pack options in which the consumer can purchase a longer range if desired.

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The Tesla 3 may be a good battery car, but the Chevy bolt is already a better value car and available. Is 39$ k or $30k after tax payer support unreasonable? Maybe not, with today's incredibly cheap money and the if one believes the battery car will drastically lower maintenance cost and improve longevity.  Is the very very inconvenient short range vehicle with minimal recharge stations and long recharge time a deal breaker for most? Yes, for most. If you love new technology and excited to accommodate such a vehicle. Well, go for it. Write it off as entertainment. More practical people will purchase a less expensive and proven car. If your attempting to save the planet, you could do more and quicker, meaning now, by fueling up with ethanol. If you are looking to the environment future, well, again ethanol will be ahead of the grid for a long time. Meaning the grid will never catch up. It's a choice, and I do like the battery car, just I can't justify such a car with my particular transportation needs. I need to downsize to one vehicle, that would probably be a Ford Eccoboost for good mileage and excellent towing abillity.     

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Consider the logistics required for battery car operation and trip planning. Life span of expensive batteries are proportional to many environmental factors. Owners need to go to school and be disciplined. Your careless drivers could really damage the vehicles battery lifespan. I read lifespan experience of Tesla drivers could be as short as 50,000 miles or calculated at maximum of 300,000 miles. When one factors in loss of capacity of battery and the desire to maximize battery lifespan, the vehicle sweet spot of consumer value is 2rd car status, short trip metro. Round trips no more than 50-70 miles one way. Daily drives limited to 150 miles. Max battery lifespan limited to 80% charge, safety factor, limit DOD, and avoid reliance of remote charge stations. Fast charging is not a smart way to maintain your battery long lifespan. Charging stations are few and need many hours of hookup to make any difference. Most probably already dedicated to a few daily commuters. The car does well in short trip metro, with operators having exact knowledge of travel requirement and weather conditions that will have major impact of length of trip plans.

 

Could one use the battery car for 80% of travel needs. Probably. Could they then rent a ICE car for the other 20%? Most would say no to that. First the hassle such as, terminal transportation, shopping and evaluating offers, risk of typical gottcha contracts, and the overhead of required strict adherence to short travel plans. Most of us do not want such restrictions and hassles. How about the autonomous vehicle or Uber? This technology will impact the battery car more than traditional vehicle. Public transportation? No one likes that option and it will slowly dissolve per lack of interest or need.

 

Think of the heavy duty truck energy requirements, towing vehicles, hauling trucks, and long distance travel vehicles. Hybrid technology will improve their efficiency, but batteries could off little substantive operating energy. Hydrogen battery could, but the economics of ICE powered by liquid fuel are hard to compete with. Convenience, another big plus for conventional vehicle owners. Maintenance, may be a plus for vehicles operating with reliable technology, simple to service, and repair. Fuel costs that already have the burden of full tax load may offer little cost penalty. Consider,  electrical energy will steadily increase in cost given the costly alternatives to generate green power, expensive and costly to maintain grid that desperately needs updating and efficiency improvements. This all points to the need of improving the production of biofuels. To improve the efficiency and green quotient of the fuel. If one wants to improve environmental factors of transportation, these fuels are just as important as the battery car trajectory. We need to quit fantasizing of battery solutions doing it all and cheap power. Those outcomes will never happen. We need to convince more government employees, for example, that sabotaging the ethanol solution will not improve your beloved battery car future.        

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I have had my Model S now since the end of October.  What an amazing car.  It goes 0-60 faster than my Challenger with the 5.7 hemi.  It handles just as good as my 3 series BMW I owned in the past.  My kids fight over who's sitting in the rear facing seats (just like sitting "gunner" in the old station wagons).  The interface is so intuitive, so it's easy to operate.  I understand now why they have sold a bunch of these.  I wake up to a "full" charge (well, set at 90% for daily use per Tesla's recommendations) every morning.  Is it a perfect car? No, and believe we'll never see one.  Range does take a hit in the winter, about 20 to 30% (or almost 50% if you just do short trips on a cold battery in the real cold, like 0 degrees F.  Once in a while my phone unpairs from the car's bluetooth.  My commute is 10 miles to work, so the range is not an issue.  I've spent a few days running errands all day, and still don't have any issues with range.  

 

What I don't miss is things like oil changes.  Had to bring the Mrs. car in for that.  The stealership tries to tell me things like power steering lines are leaking (just as my dad's van and my jeep was 6 months ago, in the same week we had oil changes on all 3 of those cars).  

 

Tesla has a decent thermal management system of its battery, which supposedly prolongs life of the battery.  Somebody uses one as a taxi between LA and Las Vegas, with 200,000 miles and only 6% range loss.  All while charging on Superchargers only.

 

The thing I like is that Tesla is pushing the envelope.  They have a great looking car on the market with performance that can match Supercars (if you have enough money).  The leaf, i-miev, and Bolt are basically compliance cars.  The leaf is truly ugly, the i-miev looks like an egg, and the bolt looks like a shoe.  None of these other auto manufacturers have really pursued electric cars.  Why?  They don't want to cannibalize their own sales of conventional cars, which is their cash cow.  The whole way the EV1 program was scrapped still leaves a bad taste in my mouth from GM.  Tesla has done something nobody else has done with an electric car- create demand for them.

 

Just like ethanol, I see electric cars as being PART of the solution.  I don't believe a single technology will reign supreme (unless big oil finds a way to rid alternatives).  Choices are good, and hope to see these choices as time goes on.  

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