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EPA vs Vehicle Carbon Emission Credit

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Another point of the Cummins E85 engine. The engine operated above 40% efficiency during test results. Only during low Hp zone did the engine drop below unleaded engine. Since coal steam turbines power most of the grid with peak efficiency in the low 30's, how could the BEV be rated above E85 engine? Note that the BEV fuel suffers additional efficiency loss from line loss, load balancing, and storage. Renewable content of grid is low and not dispatchable. Growth rate of renewable power on grid is high but as a percentage of grid low. High hydro western states may be an exception. Nuclear has no growth rate and usually neighboring coal. Natural gas gas is attractive, but not as attractive as ethanol E85 engine. California is in process of revising low carbon fuel rating system, but probably will still include unfair and arbitrary land uses penalties. The carbon rating of this E85 engine included such penalties. I just don't get why this E85 engine solution isn't put to the forefront of solutions to environmental concerns. My guess continues to be politics and voter desires don't always align with rhetoric. Petrol wealth overshadows the decision making as well as Environmental desired solutions. Environmentalist battling business wealth to manipulate politicians for desired solutions. Rhetoric of Environmentalists a tool to get desired solutions and the ethanol solution a diversion for both camps. No wonder the Cummins E85 engine didn't achieve, but a momentary blip on the public stage. Everyone wants to forget the event. Sad.      

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@greengenes.... My Hyundais pre date the current GDCIs... and have done extremely well on the higher ethanol blends. These current engines you mention would be great for ethanol... they are higher compression. And I believe are the same engines currently in use in Brazil.

 

In the movie PUMP there is an engineer questioning why FFVs in the USA are not optimized properly to use ethanol when they easily could be... Like with a single adjustment to the ECMs. Stops just short of saying these are programmed intentionally to NOT perform optimally on E-85...hmmmm.

Edited by Steve-O

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@Steve-O  ..  I know of a project underway at a college near me here in Colorado , using GM products

 

   where a handful of tricks have been applied to raise performance wth E85,  but all of the boxes on the

 

  "easy" list have already been checked.   In the case of GM, they have a lineup of mostly highend

 

  SUVs and trucks ,  where MPG numbers may not get a big bump up with such improvements. 

 

  Hate to say that by going for the CAFE credits , as laid out in legislation ,  a fraud has been perpetuated

 

 here , and no sign that Detroit 3 are the least bit interested in how this plays out ( for the alt. fuel crowd ).

 

 

  Also ,  Honda - Toyota -- other Asian automakers are missing a GIANT opportunity to score big points in 

 

 California by not offering a high MPG ethanol model..  When Gen II or III ethanol feedstocks arrive in the CA

 

 market,  now you'll see the LCFS finally make sense,   How 'bout an E85 optimized hybrid ???  Anyone???

 

 CA now has E85 infrastructure ,  and somewhat reasonable E85 pricing. So, lets take it to the next level...

 

 

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Steve-O, the GDCI technology impressive. GM had limited success upon HCCI as the ignition required such a limited range of fuel air ratios, heat, and compression with the compound problem of controlling emissions. The technology would probably match ethanol advantage in straight up comparison of ethanol SI efficiency as the ignition of CI is instantaneous across the chamber fuel. Even though ethanol has fast flame speed and can be ignited much in advanced, it would, at best match instantaneous ignition. Hyundai utilizes intake air heat for cold engine start up and allows hot exhaust to back flow into chamber for same. Same trick could solve ethanol cold start and warm up emissions. The GDCI engine produces much torque like ethanol at lower speeds. The lean burn would have been an emission problem but they utilize cooled EGR gas to dilute and prevent high temps. The engine would need to be beefy to sustain chamber pressure similar to optimized ethanol engine. It is amazing to read of such expensive R&D investments made to maximize ICE efficiency and with good results. The Cummins E85 engine by comparison was paltry investment, but with great results. What if as you and Greengenes post of investing some in optimized E85. How far could auto companies push a better fuel? The fuel has many advantages to empower state of art engine efficiency as you know. For example ethanol has much more EGR dilution ability for cooling per emission need or upon efficiency for low Hp needs. Conversely, ethanol has liquid oxygen that works to increase power density when needed. Ethanol fuel presents combustion engineers a stable fuel character due to molecular pure fuel, high cooling ability per DI, and high anti knock. IOWs, ethanol should make the job and achievements to maximize ICE efficiency easier. Another thing, emissions of concern to EPA limited to just a few. What if they did a spectrum analysis of entire waste stream? Meaning some of us would like to know the carcinogens produced? We know gasoline has hundreds of chemical compounds with high variability and with some very unhealthy constituents. Exactly what is going out the tail pipe? I read an Auto Week article that framed the fuel problem by stating diesel engine autos are expected to gain popularity in the future and may result in over supply in nations gas supply, hence the need to beef up gasoline engine to make it more attractive. So, what is Auto Weeks evaluation of ethanol sales that may push gasoline to oversupply? They appear to be concerned of petrol supply problems? Can't petrol export like they demand ethanol to do? Actually, some of this may already be happening as around here the price spread of diesel to gasoline is high. I though it was intentional to hurt ethanol. Also, the petrol industry likes to dump short chain carbon fuels to gasoline to adjust RVP and octane as they have less value. Problem is they are unhealthy and displaced by ethanol. So, what does Motor Week suggest?   

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Do you remember the squak and disbelief of pro pretrol crowd when economist evaluated cost saving of having a competitor to gas supply? Per Motor Week discussion of over supply of gasoline we can witness the cost saving right before our eyes. A refinery must produce roughly 1/2 barrel of crude to gasoline. Ethanol displaces gasoline to the tune of one million barrels per day and to the tune of 2 million barrels of crude oil. So, gas is in oversupply and consumers enjoy cheap gas, thank you ethanol fuel. Also, not to be discounted the desire of petrol to hold a knife a ethanol throat and need to maximize competitive effort for same. They could export gas and probably do, but it's more profitable in domestic market. Especially if they control the keys to entire supply. Know for sure petrol suppliers are lowering cost of gasoline above what normal market dictates would suggest. Thank you ethanol! Also, it would be great for petrol if they could convince politicians to gut the RFS as this would expose ethanol in down markets such as low corn harvest or lack of sales, to maximum financial risk. Upon such markets you can count on petrol supply chain to lower price of gasoline and wait for easy purchase of bankrupted ethanol plants. If ever politicians were working in behest of public concerns they would make every effort to empower a formidable competitor. Also, doesn't this supply condition suggest to utilize ethanol fuel to displace diesel a better alternative? The optimized E85 engine puts diesel torque generation to shame. Shouldn't ethanol be best put to use  in offsetting under supply of diesel?

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