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mpersell

Kroger-Sachse, TX finally sees the light $2.689 E85 (.10 lower with $100 Groc)

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If you accumulate $100 groceries purchases in a month then you get a .10 per gallon discount.  I filled up today at $2.589.  This forum and the knowledge acquired here has helped me narrow the gap on my 2007 Ram 1500 FFV to a cost difference of less than $2 per tank on a 20 gallon average fillup, 26 gallon tank.  I took the fuel level down to where it took 22 gallons of E85 to kick the nozzle stop.  Gauge reads full.

 

My truck is getting 14 mpg in town with a light foot and 15.8 to 16 on the freeway with a light foot at 65.  That narrow of a gap means that the E85 is making more btu under hard load than light load. While some of that is a given, a loaded engine does burn hotter. Maybe it could stand to be a little leaner at freeway conditions,  I'll look into a cold air intake with a dyno curve that measures less than 2500 rpm and shows improved air flow at lower rpm and light throttle opening. 

 

Would a hotter plug work?

 

 

 

Thanks for the kick in the butt to get the brain in gear again. (I used to work on the families alchohol fueled drag boat, I should have done better)

 

 

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Mspersell hey the Kroger Manager in Plano saying he wishes E85 would "go away" can you expand on what he said ?

 

.10 a gallon really helps when they keep the spread so tight like they have in TX ..what was it just afewmonths ago Tx was looking really good on the price spread and now they rank near the bottom

 

Somethings not right with Kroger ...This is a huge company and thye could get much better pricing and be passing the savings on top the consumer..

 

 

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My guess is he doesn't know one way another about the vehicle side of the world there.  I believe its just one more thing for him to manage in a stressful job.  The only thing I think might be happening is that people grab the cheapest and don't bother reading until after a few gallons are in the tank.

 

There was some frustration from the car next to me at the Sachse store when she saw I was paying .40 per gallon less.

 

There are 750,000 registered FFV vehicles in Texas, yet there are less than 20 working E85 stations.  In Dallas there are maybe 6 stations.  Kroger can a great job of positioning E85 to its potential. It seems the grocery chains lead the way here.  HEB is the chain pumping E85 in Central Texas.  I'm not sure about Houston but I think HEB is the leader there.

 

Austin is the state capital, the site for one of the biggest universities on the planet.  Do they have E85?  Well there is one station, 20 miles north of Austin.

 

 

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My guess is he doesn't know one way another about the vehicle side of the world there.  I believe its just one more thing for him to manage in a stressful job.  The only thing I think might be happening is that people grab the cheapest and don't bother reading until after a few gallons are in the tank.

 

There was some frustration from the car next to me at the Sachse store when she saw I was paying .40 per gallon less.

 

There are 750,000 registered FFV vehicles in Texas, yet there are less than 20 working E85 stations.  In Dallas there are maybe 6 stations.  Kroger can a great job of positioning E85 to its potential. It seems the grocery chains lead the way here.  HEB is the chain pumping E85 in Central Texas.  I'm not sure about Houston but I think HEB is the leader there.

 

Austin is the state capital, the site for one of the biggest universities on the planet.  Do they have E85?  Well there is one station, 20 miles north of Austin.)

 

 

REPLY by 1OUTLAW

 

I think you are right about the knowledge and stress both- We have several E85 stations at groceries (we also offer e10) and their business is is hectic at the groceries, plus their knowledge of cars/ fuels is low. They even struggle with e10 being ok for all vehicles. This being the case though- we have had very, very few issues come up from misfueling- my guess is since it is so new in your area- he gets overwelmed by questions and nobody went to the car dealers / mechanics nearby in advance to tell them (and educate) about what is going to be sold.

One loud mechanic with old school opinions will sour the market.

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One loud mechanic with old school opinions will sour the market.

 

Which is one reason it is critically important for those of us with real world experience with E85 to drop that info every time we can. Public perception is strongly influenced by how often folks hear the same thing from many different sources. At some point they begin to assign authority to the information just because it is common.

 

If all they hear is negatives they will believe that is the truth, if they begin to hear some folks are running it an loving it, then that provides a counter balance to the negatives.

 

Don't be afraid to occasionally ask gas stations why they are not selling it, and if they give you negative spin reason, be blunt but polite and respectful and tell them that was true 30 years ago but does not apply today.

That gives them a face saving way to change their mind --- they are right but with old data. Then tell them all the folks that are falling all over themselves to find it because it is such a good performance fuel and because it costs less per mile driven. ------ and stress that last part !! Folks are so used to thinking in terms of miles per gallon they never think of dollars per mile.

 

Larry

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I feel pretty strong about seeing as many mechanics as possible before opening a station and providing them with what cars are flex-fuel, what to expect when people misfuel, what e85 looks like (so if they see a clear material they do not say it's water), how blends change with seasons, the proper way to test alcohol content, not to totally trust their alcohol test kits (they often are wrong and cause delays in fixing real problems), web sites to go to (such as this one) to learn more, mileage variations including better models to poorer, what octane it is, that it is also a high performance race fuel, and as much as I can about what issues manufacturers have been experiencing- to name a few. Often I can only get to the service writers, mgt, and sales staff. You would not believe what some preconceptions some of these folks have.

 

Once opening a station- we try to put staff there at the pumps as much as possible to educate consumers. Grocery stores have a hard time doing all the above as do also chain C-stores.

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That is the type of complete marketing package that is needed! Especially for the first few stations in a region.

Once the average driver knows there is a new fuel to look out for , and recognizes what the bright colored hose on the pump indicates its a lot easier.

 

If they have no clue that anything but gasoline and diesel are sold they will get tunnel vision on price and pump before they realize they are buying a new product they did not know existed in their market.

 

Like you say there is so much bad info out there it is really stunning all the "urban legends" that either have basis in fact but were only valid back in the 1970's or are the subject of someones media spin to push an agenda other than alternative fuels.

 

It is kind of funny sometimes to just go a global search on E85 on google and drop in on some auto forum you have never been on and see some poor guy trying to defend E85 when he does not have any ammunition and the fools and the uninformed are jumping all over him. Then you step in and tell them that you know of hundreds of folks that are doing exactly what they say is impossible.

 

Some times you get an "oh really?" reaction and sometimes a "no Way!" reaction. Either way you have planted a seed of doubt that what they believe may not be entirely accurate. That in turn opens the door to questions and seeking answers for some.

 

The trick is to do it in a manner that does no insult them so they can gracefully abandon the bad info and move on to learning the facts.

 

Larry

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He can be as informed as he wants and they'll still jump him for being in "their turf". The flipside to it is they won't come here and talk the same trash. Talking to people face to face, I've never had someone go to the same trouble of belittlement that they'll go to on a forum.

 

"My blow off valve makes more power than your blow off valve! And that wussy biofuel stuff makes less power! Go home n00b!"  ;):P

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