Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
gasisoutrageous

E85... one year later.

Recommended Posts

It was one year ago tonight that I first put E85 in the Sebring, which I now refer to as the "E85mobile". I actually used it when I noticed the price had fallen to $3.09. That price would be a ripoff now! I had been debating it for several days.

 

Anyways, 25,000 miles later, with only what amounts to 6 gallons of ethanol blends below E50, and only 7.55 gallons of E50, nothing [that can be attributed to the fuel] has happened to my car. In fact, I've recorded numerous mpg numbers above 25... on E85!

 

One year later...

-We've gained over 300 new E85 stations, a gain of 8%. The rate of station losses has declined considerably.

-E15 and several other blends have begun to catch on like wildfire.

-Ethanol has shown miraculous recovery this year, from what could be argued as the worst drought since the dust bowl. This drought, at its peak last summer, covered an estimated 76% of the country. Hardest hit: the corn belt. We feared that another 2012 would nearly decimate the ethanol industry. 2013 proved to be a make-or-break year as a result, and it turned into a major make!

-Since yellow hose began back in October, J&H has seen their sales of E85 increase by upwards of FOUR times between October 2012 and October 2013.

-I've been to Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Maryland, Virginia, and Washington DC.

-Speedway rapidly added E85 to their stores... adding nearly 150 over the year, most of which were after June. They even retroactively converted some of their stores' second diesel tanks to E85!

-We've seen despite the EPA proposal to cut the 2014 RVOs back beyond those we had in 2013, that ethanol is still expanding wildly.

-We've now learned that Murphy USA, an enormous player in the fuel business, will be adding E15 and E85 at many of their locations!

-I've paid prices for E85 that I never thought I'd see again!

-I've met several big players in the ethanol industry, and even got a job with them!

 

I noted in another thread how the license tabs on Michigan plates (the stickers that show that the plate registration is up to date) are yellow for 2014... so let's make 2014 truly the "year of E85"!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that is quite the year...

 

Any predictions for 2014?

 

1.  Cellulosic ethanol will come on the stage, with this paving the way for not only more players to jump in, but for the existing ones to build 2nd, and 3rd plants using lessons learned from their initial plants.

2.  Murphy Oil (as you mentioned) will begin adding e85 nationwide on a grand scale

3.  Speedway will continue to add stations at a steady clip.

4.  Blender pumps in Iowa will really take off  (e15, 30, 85 seems to be the most common combination)

5. ........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely. The cellulosic will take a hit if this EPA proposal goes through, but it will not die. We do already have a couple of plants up and running, including the wood-to-ethanol plant up in Alpena, MI. I remember someone tweeted a picture of corn stover, and said "this will go in your gas tank next year" referring to the ethanol plant going up by DuPont in Emmetsburg, IA. The yellow hose program has been enormously successful, and I expect it to grow and expand next year, with other ethanol plants catching on. Ethanol may take hits, but it will never die. 2014 is a whole new year... the possibilities are unlimited.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are two corn stover plants in Iowa (emmetsburg and nevada) that will be producing this spring... and corn/wheat/sorghum/switchgrass stover in Kansas this spring as well...  corn kernal fiber bolt on plant I think this summer also in Iowa (galva)...

 

The bolt on corn kernal fiber technology could take off REALLY quickly, like the corn oil extraction...  this will mean that EVERY corn ethanol plant will be able to produce additional ethanol that will be cellulose, with no further feedstock costs, and with out additional infrastructure to handle or store feedstock... 

 

The big thing here is that the DDGS left after this process will be totally different.  This will be where the major research will be in how to best market and use this altered project.

 

Throw in the multiple MSW projects, and several others I'm missing... not to mention those overseas... and 2014 could be a landmark year for ethanol.

 

Probably why ethanolphobes are pulling out all the stops to put a halt to this...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well of course. Oil, and more specifically Energy Citizens, wouldn't be wasting their time on attacking ethanol and the RFS if they didn't see it as a threat. So while this barrage from that side is annoying and frustrating to deal with day in and day out, we should be more worried when they stop altogether.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good point... the fact that "they" see "us" as a threat finally (not just a useful stooge to help them "green-wash" their filthy environmental record... and rake in subsidized profits) means that we must be onto something.

 

-shatter the blend wall (with mid and high level blends on a massive scale)

-much wider availability of FFVs

-non corn based ethanol

 

Get these 3 things, and the 100+ year reign of the oil monopoly will be gone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've said this before, and I mentioned it in my speech. While I haven't seen consistent estimates, there are at least 15 million flex fuel vehicles. A large chunk of these people aren't even aware their vehicles are flex fuel, and another large chunk don't know anything about E85 or where to find it. We can more than easily keep up with the original RFS RVOs... by going all out on an ad and grassroots campaign. If every FFV on the road in the United States today used E85, alone, this would satisfy the RFS. We can achieve the current levels of ethanol blending more than easily without increasing ethanol blends for conventional gasoline-only vehicles, marine equipment, or outdoor power equipment.

 

Even so, there is such a thing as ethanol treatment. I've been furiously pushing this lately. You can go to the hardware or auto parts store, and purchase a 10 ounce bottle for $9. If a solution exists to this problem (which really isn't existent, but let's humor the opposition for a moment), why are we having this debate?!? That argument holds about as much water as Death Valley in June.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a good price James- similar proof material (Jim Beam, Jack Daniels, etc) runs considerably more (about $40/gal) and cause blurring of vision :P

 

At a buck and a half for an empty container weighing about 2oz it is obvious the "oil boys" still make more on the jug than the ethanol industry will. ??? Perhaps the ethanol industry (or protein production industry as I prefer to think of it) should consider succinic acid or other chemical production as a precursor to plastic/polymer production. ;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...