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dan45mcc

Iowa/Kum&Go Now has ** 2 ** 87 Octanes..Use 87 Unleaded for Prices

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For reporting prices .. I know that members cornpro and some others already know this but ..this applies to all Stations across the US, whenever you run into a situation where a Stations sells 2 of the same octane ratings..one with ethanol (E10) and one with out ..for price submissions use the unleaded that has no ethanol for comparison pricing.

 

 

We want to Compare E85 to the basic unleaded that has the least amount of ethanol

 

 

 

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A couple years ago we were discussing what to do (for price reports) when say E15 /E20 becomes the base fuel vs E85

 

 

 

 

For now we will play it just like the Kum & Go situation..but eventually we will need a formula to determine a price for pure base unleaded ..

 

 

 

 

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What do we do if we run into a station that also sells Regular Gasoline without Ethanol? Occasionally I have seen stations sell Regular without Ethanol but more often stations sell Premium without Ethanol.

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What do we do if we run into a station that also sells Regular Gasoline without Ethanol? Occasionally I have seen stations sell Regular without Ethanol but more often stations sell Premium without Ethanol.

 

 

 

 

Report the regular without Ethanol

 

 

This is issue is something we still need to look at long term.. we could say look we will compare E85 (98 to 105 octane) to  the highest Octane rating on the pump...whatever they carry 93, 95 Octane..  Should we be comparing based on Octane rating? there is a good debate for that

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I think we should look at the prices spreads for all octanes to really see the full picture.   

 

I reasoning for that is that it's pretty well known that some cars, depending on compression and engine design, tend to perform better than others when using Ethanol.

 

Only the car owner can really find the "sweet" spot for their particular make and model.  Depending on where that is, that's the fuel they want to compare the E85 price to.   

 

Unfortunately, this takes a little work and "math" from the owner of the vehicle.  Comparing it to straight premium isn't a terrible idea as it's the "closest" fuel to E85 in terms of Octane, but I think people should also know how many more MPG they get with a tank of full premium compared to a full tank of E85 and take that into consideration of the spreads.    They charge a LOT more of premium around here, and that's going to make the price spreads go through the roof, but it's also probably going to increase the level at which someone considers using E85 based on miles per dollar.

 

By looking at the price on all octanes or "blends", it also opens up the possibility of finding "deals" on blends that may be outside of your normal purchasing pattern.  For example, maybe a store is blasting out their E50 gas that even really competative to E85 in miles per dollar, and depending on your vehicle, that might be a very good deal for you.

 

......

 

And maybe I'm overthinking this........ Heh.

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K&G here in Nebraska (as well as most other stations)... are doing the same thing.  I report the e0 price (23 cents more here), then put the e10 super unleaded price in the comment section.

 

Some stations are doing a 89 octane super unleaded... (sub grade+premium+ethanol)... so that the only "ethanol free" gas is the super high priced premium gas.

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Granted I'm a bit of a noob on this site - but since 90+% (?) of the fuel sold in the US is ethanol-blended, isn't pure gasoline a bit of a boutique fuel (rarity) these days?  Outside of the mid-planes (IA, NE, SD) where sub-grade unleaded only became common in 2013, I'd venture than more stations selling E85 only sell ethanol-blended (E10 87, 89, 91, 93, etc octane) 'regular-non-FFV' fuels than sell pure gas.  

My position on that other gas reporting site is that people usually look to buy the cheapest thing, that runs in their car, so I list the E10-87 price and make a comment note if the station sells E0-87.

If e85prices.com wants E0 prices to compare against E85 - you are artificially making E85 look like a better deal from a pure BTU standpoint than if you compare to E10 - when there is a 5-10% price spread between E0 and E10.

At a minimum, I recommend changing the "submit price" form from each state view where Gasoline Price is defined as "90% Gasoline /10% ethanol (Most Gasoline in the US contains up-to 10%E)"

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Granted I'm a bit of a noob on this site - but since 90+% (?) of the fuel sold in the US is ethanol-blended, isn't pure gasoline a bit of a boutique fuel (rarity) these days?  Outside of the mid-planes (IA, NE, SD) where sub-grade unleaded only became common in 2013, I'd venture than more stations selling E85 only sell ethanol-blended (E10 87, 89, 91, 93, etc octane) 'regular-non-FFV' fuels than sell pure gas.  

My position on that other gas reporting site is that people usually look to buy the cheapest thing, that runs in their car, so I list the E10-87 price and make a comment note if the station sells E0-87.

If e85prices.com wants E0 prices to compare against E85 - you are artificially making E85 look like a better deal from a pure BTU standpoint than if you compare to E10 - when there is a 5-10% price spread between E0 and E10.

At a minimum, I recommend changing the "submit price" form from each state view where Gasoline Price is defined as "90% Gasoline /10% ethanol (Most Gasoline in the US contains up-to 10%E)"

  Hello n0cf

 

Yeah we have been over  this a few times but The point is to demonstrate the price of E85 against GASOLINE whenever possible.. Yep since 90% = of the Stations sell E10 then that is what we should be using as guidence BUT when the station sells E0 ..use the E0 price because E0 is the baseline for MPG

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