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Billyk24

31.8 mpg on E85 driving Ohio Turnpike

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[quote author=Corey872 link=topic=6348.msg41442#msg41442

 

 

 

 

 

Gentle cruising 60mph/30mpg AND 400+hp should be no problem.  Tune the thing down to the 150 hp range and I can see no reason why E85 shouldn't get very close to 40mpg in light cruising.

 

The question becomes why can't I purchase such a setup? ---That is complete vehicle at a specialized "dealership".

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The question becomes why can't I purchase such a setup? ---That is complete vehicle at a specialized "dealership".

 

This is the question I have been asking for years, too.  As I see it, there are two main routes to this:

 

1) Dealers mass produce the vehicle.  This has the benefit of OEM reliability, relatively low cost, dealer service in case of a breakdown, etc.  However, building an efficient 'E85 only' engine would certainly be a limited production run.  As running gasoline in a true E85 engine would likely cause damage, or power would be severey limited in some type of limp mode.  Though one has to ask 'If Honda can build a natural gas Civic, and the original Honda Insight was made in production runs well under 10,000/yr, why couldn't they or some other car manufacturer make a reasonably priced E85 engine?

 

2) Aftermarket - you could have some type of aftermarket race shop or engine builder make an engine.  The downside(s) here are that you are subject to the quality of that particular builder.  Also, a true E85 engine needs to be a ground-up redesign.  Cobbling aftermarket parts and pieces can get you close, but it's sort of like trying to build a diesel engine out of gasoline engine parts or vice versa.  This would also be more expensive than a mass produced engine due to it's 'one-off' nature.

 

The other main roadblock now is inconsistency in the fuel.  As I've said before, variation in E85 composition is a sure way to kill any kind of dedicated/efficient engine possibility.  The 70-85% seasonal swing might be just barely tolerable, but this '51% minimum' sure is not.

 

Can you imagine if you went to a gas pump marked '87 octane regular' and it actually dispensed anything from ~75 octane to 87 octane - and you had no real way to tell which was going to come out at any given time?  Engines would be destroyed trying to run the low octane stuff and people would be furious. 

 

Yet this is where E85 is at today.  Saved only by the fact there are only a handfull of true ;E85 only' engine out there. ...and only a handfull of people who can really take advantage of the cheap fuel and true high mileage / high power potential of E85.

 

 

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The other main roadblock now is inconsistency in the fuel.  As I've said before, variation in E85 composition is a sure way to kill any kind of dedicated/efficient engine possibility.  The 70-85% seasonal swing might be just barely tolerable, but this '51% minimum' sure is not.

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah that 51% kills any chance of an truly optimized E85 Engine..  We are stuck with basic FFV (mass produced vehicles) unless some technology has  away around that ...or the 51% is raised back up to 70% min

 

 

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