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Can you post on the E85 website.  I have not visited in some time but wanted to see if some of these guys could start contacting the salesmen in their area.  Ask these 3 questions and we will see if BG will respond.  Unfortunately BG is right here in Wichita.  I visited them 3 months ago and now it has turned very negative against me.

 

 

 

If the oil companies want to make aggressive ethanol by adding salt, fine.  I can make aggressive gasoline by concentrating just the upper 20% of gasoline as see what happens to seals and fuel hoses.

 

How ethanol contributes to free radical oxidation?

How does ethanol contribute to carbon deposit?

How does ethanol create GLOP?

To find your nearest source for BG Products; http://www.bgprod.com/bgdistloc/distloc.php

 

Recently, there has been an increase in the attacks on ethanol and one of the largest companies for various additives is still going too far.  B&G Products is putting in auto garages and parts stores in certain areas of the country an ad campaign the mixes facts and myths.  Current emails exchanges with this company indicate this isn’t going to change anytime soon.

First let’s separate off road issues and this is to include vintage vehicles.  Most of the fuel systems for off road and 25+ year old vehicles are open vent which means long term storage has the potential for allowing outside air to breath in and out during temperature changes.  This issue comes up a lot in various articles which is the target for many to say ethanol attracts water.  What isn’t stated is that this is likely one of the biggest reason for gasoline problems as well.  Ethanol is blamed in most cases but gasoline going bad is not due to ethanol but mostly gasoline being exposed to atmospheric conditions.

Products that treat the fuel for both long term storage and protecting small engines is good preventative  maintenance especially when exposure to outside environmental condition are likely.

Gold Eagle, producers of STA-BIL has written a very informative White Paper which covers both gasoline and ethanol which is beneficial in understanding the overall issues of gasoline today.

 

http://www.goldeagle.com/UserFiles/file/STA-BIL%20files/White_Paper_Ethanol_%20Blended_Gasline.pdf

 

Our suggestion is to locate BG’s regional distributors in your area and ask if they are putting out Corporate B&G Products displays as the one copied below.  Ask these regional contacts if they can support the data being stated below.

 

BGAd_zps8672de8f.jpeg?t=1374497515

width=700 height=525http://i1274.photobucket.com/albums/y428/cessna15/Whatsinyourtank_zps18044f09.jpg[/img]

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wow...  I feel like I was in a time macine, transported back to the late 1800s...  some guy with a fancy carriage wearing a finely tailored suite with a classy top hat begins selling his wears, talking about how this marvelous elixir he's selling will cure us of all sorts of ailments.  He has wonderfully drawn out charts and graphics to illistrate how it "works"...

 

What is funny is how people will scoff at how "uneducated" and "ignorent" their ancestors were to fall for such "snake oil salesmen"....

 

NOT MUCH HAS CHANGED!

 

Interesting scientific term "GLOP"...

 

I always understood that ethanol absorbed water and allowed it to be harmlessly combusted, and not alowed to build up in the tank... (unlike gas)...

 

They need a nice little charty-thingy to show how too much gas in the tank leads to the build up of "VARNISH"...

 

 

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If possible, I would like some clarification on this statement?

 

If the oil companies want to make aggressive ethanol by adding salt, fine.  I can make aggressive gasoline by concentrating just the upper 20% of gasoline as see what happens to seals and fuel hoses.

 

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Appendix D & E are the references for using aggressive ethanol.  CRC especially, in the past had used aggressive ethanol during testing.  You will see on page 3/39, some comments about different hydrocarbons.  Using a straight run of toluene isn’t really testing aromatics effects when consumer gasoline has much more variation.

Look at 3.3.4  ionic compounds----

Salt_zps789874ab.jpg

I have the whole PDF in an Email but don't know how to post it here.

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I was able to research that UL added salt and sulfuric acid to ethanol for testing. And also was able to find a letter to UL from Growth Energy stating that this was not the true composition of fuel ethanol. So what I am trying to find out is... why would they be donig this at this time to E-85 sold at a terminal..... and is it even legal?

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There's too much in this topic that I don't understand. But from what I've read thus far, I kind of wish I had the money to go down there and spray paint all over that chart, and avoid areas where there is correct information  ;D

 

These people have an obvious interest in keeping gasoline as the main fuel source. I don't advocate for E85 as the solution to a lot of our fuel problems, but rather a solution. I think we've all seen what happens when we have one primary fuel source...

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