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muscleon85

Ethanol for my classic cars!

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My name is Carlos and I'm from South America. I actually have some american classic cars like Dodge Coronet, Ford LTD 1971, Chevrolet Caprice, Chevrolet malibu and a nice Camaro. I love this cars and I want to add  some cars to my garage and I really ate moderns cars.

 

But In my country the gas prices are really high, about 5.2 US for 1 gallon of 89 Octane so I was thinking to convert one of my cars to E100. I readed some posts of the forum and I conclude that I can use E100 only if I dont run the car in very cold places but I don't worry about it because here's no stations.

 

What should I change from my carb to make it compatible with E100? (I don't want to buy a new alcohol carburetor because all of them are very expensive and doesn't has secondary vacuum) I want to have a gasoline carb and an alcohol carb to swap them when could be necessary

 

Must I rebuild my car engine with new parts? (none of my cars have more than 110.000 stock moles)

 

Should I change the oil of my engine to a new one?

 

Must I change my gas tank?

 

If I'm on the road and get out of alcohol can I swap the carburetor for the gasoline carb, put gas on my tank and run it?

 

Thanks to everyone who can help me

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Hi Carlos,

 

Those modern cars which you hate, have fuel injection, which make them easy to convert to higher blends and they can run nearly any % of ethanol without being rich or lean. Since you have to calibrate your carb to one %, it's going to be difficult to swap carbs without the tank being nearly empty. You might want to consider a second tank so you have a tank for each fuel.

 

Where will you get your fuel? Can you count on it always being E100?

 

Have you priced out fuel injection conversions? It would save you a LOT of work and you wouldn't have to worry about going too lean and burning exhaust valves.

 

Thumpin and maybe e85racer are our carb experts, otherwise most of the rest of us have fuel injected vehicles.

 

It might be helpful to specify the year on all your vehicles. If there's a big range in years, your oldest one might have the highest compression, but the newest one might be more ethanol resistant.

 

Ethanol loves compression so if you have vehicles that need premium gas or have > 11:1 compression, that's good. The engine itself should be ok as-is unless you want to swap out high compression heads, which will make it more difficult to run straight gasoline.

 

I would think most vehicles ~1970 or newer should have had most rubber parts replaced, but the carbs will need rebuilding with larger jets. Obviously your fuel delivery system (tank, fuel lines, pump, carb) will need the most attention. Your fuel pump will need to pump about 25% more fuel, in theory.

 

Also, keep in mind that ethanol is responsible for a lot of tire, clutch and driveline problems due to all the extra power it creates.  ;D

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Hi TD thank you for reply my post. I'm going to explain you something...  :)

 

Actually I tried to convert some of my cars to run in CNG so due to the experiece adquired with this I decided to install a lambda probe system in all of my cars exhaust system so I know If my car is running lean or rich, if is running lean sound indicator starts making noise. I think this could be a solution for ethanol

 

I actually had destilled some ethanol gallons with a proof between 172 and 185 from a very cheap sugar source (Each gallon costs to me 0.8 US Dollars )

 

Have you priced out fuel injection conversions? It would save you a LOT of work and you wouldn't have to worry about going too lean and burning exhaust valves.

 

I want to keep my cars with their carburetor, a EFI System is expensive

 

It might be helpful to specify the year on all your vehicles. If there's a big range in years, your oldest one might have the highest compression, but the newest one might be more ethanol resistant.

 

My newer car is a chevrolet monte carlo 1974 and the oldest one is my camaro 1968. All of them are daily drivers and has automatic transmission

 

Ethanol loves compression so if you have vehicles that need premium gas or have > 11:1 compression, that's good. The engine itself should be ok as-is unless you want to swap out high compression heads, which will make it more difficult to run straight gasoline.

 

None of my cars runs on premium fuel  ;) but can be a good option to raise a bit the compression to have a better experience with ethanol and run on premium gasoline when can be necessary. But I don't have idea how can raise the engine  compression.

 

I would think most vehicles ~1970 or newer should have had most rubber parts replaced, but the carbs will need rebuilding with larger jets. Obviously your fuel delivery system (tank, fuel lines, pump, carb) will need the most attention. Your fuel pump will need to pump about 25% more fuel, in theory.

 

Also, keep in mind that ethanol is responsible for a lot of tire, clutch and driveline problems due to all the extra power it creates.  ;D

 

In some website I readed that I should use 25% larger jets in my carburetor.

 

What I need to change in my fuel delivery system? All of my cars has their stock fuel system

 

What problems may cause the use on ethanol in my classic cars and how can I prevent it?  :'(

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