Jump to content
storky

E-85 Conversion/Option for hybrid

Would an available E-85 Conversion kit or new vehicle option make hybrids more attractive?  

10 members have voted

  1. 1. Would an available E-85 Conversion kit or new vehicle option make hybrids more attractive?

    • Yes, I think it might enhance the efficiency and green credentials.
      4
    • Yes, anything to reduce oil dependency!
      4
    • No, it would diminish the efficiency - damage the green credentials.
      0
    • No, Hybrids are efficient (green) enough.
      1
    • No way, I'd never consider a Hybrid under any circumstance!
      0


Recommended Posts

In 2006, green vehicle websites noted the debut of a flex fuel Ford Escape Hybrid research vehicle, but I've heard little since.

 

greencarcongress.com/2006/01/ford_unveils_fl.html

 

greencar.com/articles/fords-flex-fuel-escape-hybrid.php

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In 2006, green vehicle websites noted the debut of a flex fuel Ford Escape Hybrid research vehicle, but I've heard little since.

 

greencarcongress.com/2006/01/ford_unveils_fl.html

 

greencar.com/articles/fords-flex-fuel-escape-hybrid.php

 

I think it's for the reasons I mentioned... water in the oil from low coolant temps and possibly from premature cat failure from low exhaust temps. (Hybrids tend to run lower exhaust temps.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found more from 2008, but cannot seem to find the results of the testing:

 

gas2.org/2008/06/13/prototype-ford-escape-plug-in-hybrid-88-mpg-on-85-ethanol/

 

Ford has delivered a plug-in hybrid electric flex-fuel Escape to the DOE to join its test fleet of other PHEVs currently undergoing research and testing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Renewable Fuel Association out of Washington DC got their hands on a 2008 E-85 Ford Escape Hybrid and reported on a 31 mpg average driving around New York State a few years ago.  Ford Motor company lent out about "20" of these vehicles for a  two year "trial" period in which they received feedback and information.  The experiemental E85 Ford Escape Hybrids:

 

2009-current that used PHEV (plug-in capabilities and lithium ion batteries)  There was at least 22 of these driven by various electrical/power companies providing feedback.

 

phevfordescapee85sign.jpg   

 

The 2008 E85 FEH that used the normal design platform but was made E-85 capable.  A number of ethanol plants got one for a two year trial.

RFAE85EscaoeHbyridLargee-mailview.jpg

 

a>

 

The first generation 2005-07 FEH E85 vehicles.  Mostly found in Missouri, Illinois, Iowa. 

e85escapeatpump.jpg

 

Issues?  Vehicles needed a more aggressive emission setup to cope with the frequent start up and stop ICE operation found with hybrid vehicles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So . . . they've got a full six years of test data. When does Ford rollout the redesigned Escape? Is it likely to introduce an E85 hybrid to the public?

 

I've also seen rumors of retirement of the Escape nameplate. What might be it's successor?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So . . . they've got a full six years of test data. When does Ford rollout the redesigned Escape? Is it likely to introduce an E85 hybrid to the public?

 

I've also seen rumors of retirement of the Escape nameplate. What might be it's successor?

 

The 2013 Escape does not have a hybrid version.  It does have two EcoBoost (1.6L  and 2.0L) versions that might love E85.  The Fusion and the new C-Max vehicle carries on the hybrid technology and will offer a plug in version.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While visiting the Chicago Auto Show, I examined the Chevrolet Volt and Spark, numerous Hyundai hybrids, the Prius C and V, and the Ford Focus EV and Fusion Hybrid Energi. Regrettably, I completely missed the C-Max.

 

Prior to purchasing our Prius, we owned a Plymouth Grand Voyager. We loved the spaciousness of the minivan, but hated the unreliability and freaky gremlins in the electronics. During a collision repair, the Ford Flex was our assigned rental. The Flex was roomy and comfortable, but 16 mpg on my commute removed it from serious consideration.

 

Having just been introduced to the Ford C-Max Hybrid literally yesterday, I think it has just joined the list of viable new purchase candidates. Regardless of which plugin hybrid I choose, I'm staking out one of the two remaining unused charging stations at my employer. Currently those charging stations are the exclusive domain of the Chevy Volt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Ford C-MAX Hybrid debut is looking more enticing:

 

Ford C-MAX Hybrid Earns EPA 47 City, 47 Highway, 47 Combined

 

No news yet on whether the 2.0l 4-cyclinder can sip E-85.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...