Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
HuskerFlex

Beet-ethanol plant in ND a go for fall '12!

Recommended Posts

http://www.ethanolproducer.com/articles/8637/energae-signs-purchase-agreement-for-alchem-investors-sought

 

Energae signs purchase agreement for Alchem, investors sought

 

A corn ethanol plant that has been idle since October 2007 and was sold at auction in the fall of 2010 is now being reinvented as a 10 MMgy sugar beet-to-ethanol production facility. Energae LP, a Clear Lake, Iowa, energy investment group, has announced it signed a purchase agreement and is now working to find sugar beet farmers to supply the plant with feedstock...

 

...The group hopes to begin producing ethanol this fall, in time for sugar beet harvest. Letters will be sent out to sugar beet growers in a 50-mile radius of the plant and meetings are planned at the site next week. Grafton is located about 50 miles south of the Canadian border in an area known for sugar beet production, according to an American Sugar Alliance map of sugar beet production.

 

Sugar beet farmers in that area are already supplying sugar beets to American Crystal Sugar Co., which operates five sugar beet processing plants within 20 to 100 miles of Grafton and produces sugar for human consumption. Energae will be asking producers to commit to producing a certain amount of acres of sugar beets for the ethanol plant. “We don’t feel it will be difficult because we have talked to quite a few,” he told EPM. “We’re not asking for a lot of acres, we just need a certain amount of tons to produce the 10 million gallons a year.” He declined to give a specific number...

 

...Energae also operates Permeate Refining in Hopkinton, Iowa. That 5 MMgy plant produces ethanol from mainly corn and wheat starch, but it can also utilize other feedstocks such as corn syrup, cheese byproduct whey and paper products, he said. Both plants were designed by the same company in Germany.

 

The Grafton plant will sell sugar beet pulp leftover at the end of fermentation process as a livestock feed. “It’s different than the waste product that the sugar beets put out because we put some additives to it to make it valuable to the cattle growers,” he said.

 

Other developers are looking into energy beets for ethanol production, including Green Vision Group, which wants to build dedicated energy beet ethanol plants in North Dakota. Energae is targeting sugar beets because they are already being grown in the area around the former Alchem plant, Krause said, adding that energy beets are still a possibility down the road. “We’d sure take a look at it,” he said.

 

**********************************************************

 

cellulose/msw ethanol plants scattered across the map from corner to corner of the continent. Gas prices sky high, and widely predicted to only climb from here... and now OTHER new non-corn feedstocks.

 

Bring on the BLENDER PUMPS! ;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've often wondered that... if you took the various co-products from various biofuel feedstocks, (all of which are quality feeds) and built a large feed mill to process them, you could probably make a very high quality feed ration that would be worth MUCH more, and be of MUCH higher feed value then any of the individual co-products.  Would be a great "value added" spin off job from the ethanol industry...

 

Corn DDGS

Beet Pulp

Soymeal

Algea Meal (when that comes on line to process the CO2 from ethanol)...

 

add these together with some other trace ingredients to meed the nutritional targets...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the cool thing with the beet-ethanol concept... is that when they get it up and going, it will REALLY take off.  They have developed "energy beets" that are basically grown the same way, but produce more "sugars" for ethanol then a standard "table sugar beet", and can be grown on many more types of soils, with much different climates... so you'll see them grown in areas outside of typical sugar beet regions (red river valley, N. Wisconsin, Michigan ...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It will be interesting to see how beets figure into crop rotation schemes, as well.

 

Would some of the corn operations  pick up beets to smooth out market price swings, etc??

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most corn plants are 55-110 mgy capasity (many larger)

 

These are more in the 10-30mgy size...  I could see adding this to an existing corn plant, and cutting their corn usage... so using 2 feedstocks... so less dependent on simply one feedstock.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they have to know something we don't...  I'd think that in the last 6 years they must have made some developments.

 

I rember reading that they found that it was "possible" but was not profitable at "current market and technological conditions"...

 

I hope that they are not counting $5 gas to make this profitable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...