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1outlaw

BP's Hiring Staff for a 2014 Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in FL

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A month ago BP posted Ag Engineering jobs for design of farm roads, drainage, etc.

 

Now BP let out a little more information with this job post:

 

Job Description          BP Biofuels is a material part of the Alternative Energy division of BP. It plays a fundamental role in the energy future of BP by developing emerging technologies to generate material growth and revenue options for BP. The BP Biofuels business is embarking on an aggressive growth agenda through joint ventures and internal growth in Brazil and the USA.

 

BP Biofuels is building a 35 mgy cellulosic-ethanol facility in Highlands County, Florida, USA. Operation of the facility will commence in 2014.

 

The Engineering Manager for this project is responsible for defining scope and ensuring that the proper engineering principles, codes, standards and processes are employed in the development of the portfolio of commercial plants envisioned by BP Biofuels. This role is responsible for the successful execution of all the engineering work on the project including process safety, plant design, budget, schedule and quality. The successful candidate will lead the engineering team to develop and make commercial BP’s proprietary cellulosic ethanol technology. The Engineering Manager ensures that the project is in compliance with all local, state and federal requirements, that the appropriate risk assessments and technical reviews are conducted to ensure safe operations and that all changes to design are managed and properly documented. A key responsibility will be to ensure appropriate engineering contractor capability is accessed through the project’s contracting strategy.

 

The role will involve working closely with the appointed EP Contractor to fully define engineering requirements then subsequently ensure compliance to these requirements which will include the timely review and ‘sign-off’ of key documentation. During the construction and commissioning phases of the project the Engineering Manager will ensure that the plant is constructed to the defined requirements and provide commissioning and start up support.

 

The Engineering Manager will have a team of engineers reporting to this role that has been sized in accordance with guidelines from IPA for the delivery of a new technology major project. The project is currently in Select will is targeting moving to Define by July 2012. Construction will initiate with civil activities during 4Q2012. Travel will be required by the manager and their team to the various equipment suppliers and to the Highland site.

 

The role will report initially to the US Project General Manager.  Desired Skills & Experience• External candidates must have Biofuels (corn/sugar ethanol) experience.

• Engineering Manager experience (minimum of 15 years) including at least one major project in excess of $250 million.

• Ability to participate in the development of and adherence to project budgets, plans and strategies.

• Solid understanding of petrochemical industry related codes, standards, and specifications (API, ASME, etc.) and ability to adapt the ethanol industry codes, standards and specifications for use by BP.

• Experience with HAZID, HAZOP, Inherently Safe Design, LOPA, pHSSErs and FMEA.

• Knowledge of the engineering standards associated with Process Safety Management and Integrity Management.

• Experienced in delivering key assurance processes in the following areas: Major Projects, Integrity Management and Project Health, Safety, Security, Environmental Reviews (PHSSER).

• Self-motivated, accustomed to being in positions of responsibility and accountability with good planning and communication skills.

• Ability to perform successfully in an ambiguous environment and with new technology.

• Innovative and able to think “out of the box†to delivery new technology to a commercial outcome.

• Ability to effectively prioritize multiple tasks and responsibilities.

• Strong leadership skills and able to motive and engage a diverse team.

• Track record of developing and coaching others to be successful.

 

Other essential skills and knowledge Biofuels Competencies:

• Value Creator: Focuses their energy on the actions that will add the greatest value to Biofuels, showing initiative, flexibility and resilience in doing so. Seeks to exceed expectations and look beyond the tried and tested to solve problems.

• People Developer: Works to achieve own and others’ potential. Balances the pressure to focus on short-term delivery with the longer-term need to develop the next generation of talent for the business.

• Great Partner: Builds strong and enduring relationships across and outside the business. Collaborates effectively at all levels, recognising the value of those with different expertise and from different backgrounds.

• Operational Expertise: Simplifies and clarifies situations and processes; delivers operational value through intelligent application of processes; strives for “silent running†operations.

 

Company Description

About BP Our business is the exploration, production, refining, trading and distribution of energy. This is what we do, and we do it on a truly global scale. With a workforce of 80,000 employees, BP operates with business activities and customers in more than 80 countries across six continents. Every day, we serve millions of customers around the world. We are continually looking for talented, committed and ambitious people to help us shape the face of energy for the future.

 

At BP Alternative Energy we're investing in new ways of providing energy - from innovative new solar and wind businesses to advanced biofuels and clean energy technologies such as the capture and storage of carbon dioxide from traditional fossil fuels. These will provide customers with clean, secure energy - and they will shape the evolution of the global energy industry in the coming decades.

 

In Biofuels, our business in conventional products such as bio-ethanol is already substantial, accounting for about 10% of the world market. However, as well as providing today's biofuels, we're also developing tomorrow's. We are investing $500 million over 10 years in the Energy Biosciences Institute to explore options for advanced biofuels and other applications of biotechnology to energy.

 

 

 

 

Additional InformationPosted:February 22, 2012Type:                      Full-time              Experience:                      Director              Functions:                      Engineering              Industries:                      Oil & Energy              Compensation:Commesurate with ExperienceEmployer Job ID:exploratoryJob ID:2596378

  • Apply on Company Website

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I know we don't like the idea of big oil (not many bigger then BP) getting into the ethanol business... not a lot of trust between the grass roots of the ethanol industry and the tops of the oil industry...

 

BUT...

 

This is cool.  YET ANOTHER cellulose ethanol plant going into production in the near future...  I'm curious how many "gallons of ethanol/acre" they are going to be producing with this "energy grass"... and how this compares to corn, sugar, sweet sorghum...

 

Very cool.  Too bad I'm wholly unqualified and inexperienced to apply for the job :'(

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I know we don't like the idea of big oil (not many bigger then BP) getting into the ethanol business... not a lot of trust between the grass roots of the ethanol industry and the tops of the oil industry...

 

BUT...

 

This is cool.  YET ANOTHER cellulose ethanol plant going into production in the near future...  I'm curious how many "gallons of ethanol/acre" they are going to be producing with this "energy grass"... and how this compares to corn, sugar, sweet sorghum...

 

Very cool.  Too bad I'm wholly unqualified and inexperienced to apply for the job :'(

 

The math on this one works out to 1800/gal acre assuming no land is used for roads, drainage systems/rivers, trees, or buildings. That of course is also assuming that BP will grow all it's own crop.

 

The fact that BP plans to grow it's own crop does not suprise me (especially since this is a new type of crop and the desire to truck it minimal distances) but at the same time, I am very bothered by a multi-national owning large tracts of land. When any big corp owns US land and tries to drill down to totally vertically integrate it smacks of another form of market control and loss of small business (and the land owner becomes employee here). Yes- I get very worried about Foreign land ownership and major corp ownership of land on several levels some of which includes manipulation, crop choices, enviromental effects, affect on ag suppliers, employment, etc. Just look at the problems surrounding the poultry and swine industries for a micro sized clue of what this might look like. Not all bad- but I feel the bad outweighs the good.

 

Now we will just have to wait and see if BP or others expand on this land ownership route or chose to let farmers contract grow for them. The issue with contract growers is that they have choices and then suddenly the distance one hauls the crop increases if you are not willing to bid successfully. 

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I hear you there...

 

Nebraska has long held a policy banning "corporate farming"... which banned large corporations from setting up shop in the state, driving up the price of land, and driving out family farms...

 

So when IBP, Tyson and other mega companies want to set up shop in the state, they must do it THROUGH family farms.  They will contract through a family farm, and basically make them a "sub-contractor".  Many farmers back where I grew up did this.  They were contracted to produce ONLY for the company that built the faciliity for x years (can't rembber how many), use their rations, and their animals, after which they were free to go it their own.  By that time the buildings and equipment were pretty run down.  They could renew with the company, who would totally renovate the facilities, or they could sever ties, and renovate themselves... most stick with the company.

 

This was a pretty good deal for small family farms.  There wasn't enough money (80s and 90s) to buy land and expand the farm (not making money on the crops, so why pay to expand...), so it allowed small farms to keep up, and for multiple children to stay on the farm.

 

In other states they simply would have bought land (at a HUGE markup), then built the facilities, and paid barely above minimum wage for their staff...  most all the money leaving the state...

 

1800 g/acre... how is that compared with corn or sugar?

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How does that compare in yield per acre?

CORN = 420 to 600 gal/ acre BUT also yields 2800 to 4100 lbs of DDG/ acre (about 1000 lbs of 100% pure protein), 100 to 300 lbs of corn oil/ acre, and about 2800 - 4100 lbs of CO2/dry ice /acre.

SUGAR CANE = have not seen #'s lately but about 1100-1200 gal/ acre BUT also provides it's own process energy OR will yield more ethanol (similar to BP's project?) if the cellulose is utilized for ethanol production (not aware of this taking place yet. No feed product if the cellulose is burned for energy or used for ethanol- if not, some of the baggasse could be feed if cattle are real close to the plant.

BP's process = 1800/ acre? (makes some assumptions about plant capacity vs the land BP plans to operate). I have not seen yet what (if any) byproducts will result from the use of the cellulose or energy gain/used.

 

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Ahhh- I see I did not add the cellulosic gallons from the same acre of corn as I did the others. IF you are not going to do cellulosic from DDG or solubles (I know it was looked at but no one is doing it right now) but instead are going to do corn cobs or stalks then that must also be added. I would only guess at this -- another 150-200 gal/acre? with more CO2, same corn oil, and same DDGS. Left over lignin can be processed and sold or burned for power.

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