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Fuel Line Heater.... Might be what I need?

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Howdy all,

 

I haven't been on here in a while... I've relocated from the E85 haven of Houston, TX to the 4 seasons, E85 deprived location of Southern Maryland...

 

Life has been busy, but I still have my E85 convereted "Fun-Mobile", the 1991 Nissan 240SX.

Well, up here, it actually gets cold, and I am currently working 3rd shift (2300-0600) where the nights get colder, but I still would like to drive the 240SX sometimes. Currently, I'm a bit worried about the cold start issues, and with the beast sitting out in the parking lot all night getting cold soaked, I am wondering if it will fire up... so I have been looking for a solution...

 

I started looking for fuel heaters, or fuel line heaters and I came across these:

 

http://www.fattywagons.com/fwproducts.htm

 

TDI%20injector%20line%20heaters.jpg

 

Injection%20Kit.JPG

 

Make sure you have hot Veg Oil going into your injectors. Our patent pending injector line heaters (pictured above) are guaranteed to get the job done. They heat the injector lines to over 200f in 1-3 minutes. The current draw is about 8 amps / 100 watts.  We recommend a contact area of about 4-6" on each injector line. Our 30" 100 watt heater will work on most 4 thru 6 cylinder cars with displacements of up to 3.5 liters (3500cc).  For V-8 (Ford / GM) and larger inline 6 cylinder engines (Cummins) use 2 100 watt heaters.  Price is for each heater is $30.00. Shipping included in the Continental USA. Anywhere else add $10 with the shipping button at the bottom of the page.

 

I'm wondering if wrapping the fuel rail feed hard line, which is connected to the fuel rail will heat the E85 enough to help the engine fire off (no pun intended... ;) )

 

Comments?

Suggestions?

 

Thanks

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Comments?

Suggestions?

Find a way( plug or rubber hose you can disconnect)into the intake manifold and squirt a little starting fluid(ether). I can't believe how instant the start is on my 1992 Toyota 4x4 with 22RE engine. Just don't go overboard---work your way up.

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Comments?

Suggestions?

 

If you have access to plug it in, add a 120V electric engine block heater?  Add a coolant hose wrapped around the fuel log? Plug it in and it will be warm enough to not cause a problem? Once the engine starts it should take over and keep the fuel warm.

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Comments?

Suggestions?

Find a way( plug or rubber hose you can disconnect)into the intake manifold and squirt a little starting fluid(ether). I can't believe how instant the start is on my 1992 Toyota 4x4 with 22RE engine. Just don't go overboard---work your way up.

 

 

That's what I did on the old Nissan Truck Cessna..I drilled a hole in the right fender added a grommet and ran  a hose to the air cleaner..drilled another hole in it..added another grommet and inserted the hose.  Of Course wouldn't do this to a newer vehicle but for the old pickup ..worked great ..just gave it a shot of starting fluid every morning

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Morning Bow ..yeah that might work just fine for Texas..I'm not sure about here in Minnesota pulling 8 amps for 3 minutes when it's 10 below outside on a cold battery

 

Actually, that is the only thing the concerns me... 8 amps for 2-3 minutes on a cold battery.... but Maryland doesn't get as cold as MN... and if it was THAT cold, I wouldn't pull the car out....

 

Comments?

Suggestions?

Find a way( plug or rubber hose you can disconnect)into the intake manifold and squirt a little starting fluid(ether). I can't believe how instant the start is on my 1992 Toyota 4x4 with 22RE engine. Just don't go overboard---work your way up.

 

I could do that, but I'd like something a little more automated... I don't want to pop the hood every time I want to start up after work

 

Comments?

Suggestions?

 

If you have access to plug it in, add a 120V electric engine block heater?  Add a coolant hose wrapped around the fuel log? Plug it in and it will be warm enough to not cause a problem? Once the engine starts it should take over and keep the fuel warm.

 

I could do the 120V thing at the house easy, but not at work. The car is garage kept at the house, and I don't actually pull it out that often.. and considering I now have a 55 mile, 1-way trip to get E85, it will probably be driven less... (did I mention Maryland sucks?).

 

But i have actually considered a oil pan heater for it even in the garage.

 

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But i have actually considered a oil pan heater for it even in the garage.

 

I was going to suggest that also, but most don't know what that is and they are harder to find. I've used commercial magnetic oil heaters for HVAC compressors.

 

Whatever you end up doing, good luck and share your result.

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http://www.wolverineheater.com/

 

I found those the other night...

 

For an update though, I ordered one of the 100Watt fuel line heater kits from Fatty Wagon. Call it a $30 experiment.

 

I need to replace a pin-hole leaker heater hose on the car anyway, so while I'm in there, I can install the fuel line heater (and the EGR setup is going to be MIA when I get done....)

 

After some thought, I really do not think 8 amps for 3 mintes is going to be a huge drain on the battery.

 

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It sounds interesting though.

 

I have looked at every option I heard about. I was never able to use any of the pad-heaters, as the surface it can be attached to, has to be "Smooth – No bumps, ridges, ribs, fins, indentations, grooves, holes or part numbers can be allowed in the installation area".

 

None of the last 5 vehicles I had would qualify. Once I found a small smooth surface, but the output of the pad would have been so low that I didn't think it would help.

 

I always use block heaters (thus you need a receptacle), combined with a electric heater inside. Warm interior, no snow or ice on the windows.

 

BTW: I found that Kat's makes this heater pads as well, but they are cheaper.

 

The block heaters from the factory for our latest vehicles only supplied up to 350 watts. On our last vehicle I bought a block heater from Jeg's for half the price (around $30, fall special), it supplies a whooping 650 watts. Takes only about 2 hours to get the coolant warm enough for the temperature gauge to show between cold and minimum. Instead heat out of the vents.

 

The cold start situation did not change significantly. Priming (turning ignition on/off several times) does the trick, but now once the car starts, it runs fine much faster.

 

Greetings!

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I had to do ignition on/off/on the other day when the outside temp was in the teens. Have they delayed winter blend this year due to the record high Midwest temps? I shouldn't have to do this until it's -15°F.

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