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man114

What a weird week in E85 locally for me

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Well late last week I stopped at a station I never frequent, which had a spread of only 20 cents or so because it was where I was going and frankly I was too cheap to spent $3.79 a gallon for gas since I hadn't gone to the bank yet (E85 was $3.59). The station was Sunoco, but the pumps said that the E85 wasn't provided by Sunoco (and didn't say where it was from either). They even went so far as to say that the E85 was at least 70% Ethanol.

 

After much driving around I stopped by my usual station where the price of E85 dropped 10 cents to $3.19 vs. $3.71 (that stretch is cheaper on gas, and while gas went down 3 cents since the prior week the E85 took a bigger hit). The station right before is boasting that their 91 octane premium (which is low considering most are 93 octane) is Ethanol free. The next station down, within a stones throw is boasting E85. Wonder which one is right. I can say with certainty that the 91 octane premium isn't exactly cheap.

 

About the only thing I could say is the E85 pumps at the expensive station pump faster. Don't think its worth the premium. Gas on the Reseravation of an undetermined octane and blend ratio is hovering near $3.20-3.25 almost worth the drive down if I had a bigger tank. At least I know they're sourcing the gas from Canada, which they're proud of. Can't say where the stuff comes from from the non reservation gas stations, they don't care to say.

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The "minimum 70%" is a seasonal labeling thing...  I think ALL states adjust between "winter blend" (70%) and "summer blend" (85%), with an intermediate "spring/fall blend" of 75% or something...  depending on how far north or south you are... the switch over is earlier or later...  this is to assure better cold starting performance, since the higher the ethanol content, the more susceptible they are to not wanting to start in cold weather...

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I have seen 2 labels in regards to E-85 depending on the station, but never seen a station change them.

 

Some stations use the MAXIMUM 85%

 

Some stations use the MINIMUM 70%

 

I guess either would be accurate 365 days a year wouldn't it?

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I have seen 2 labels in regards to E-85 depending on the station, but never seen a station change them.

 

Some stations use the MAXIMUM 85%

 

Some stations use the MINIMUM 70%

 

I guess either would be accurate 365 days a year wouldn't it?

 

 

And lets not forget the 51% Minimum that James seen a few weeks back http://e85vehicles.com/e85/index.php/topic,5114.msg34272.html#msg34272

 

 

 

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that one really perplexes me?  What are they selling, and how does it vary? When does it change? 

 

At least with the e70-85, with seasonal mandated changes the changes are not all that huge, and follow a set and somewhat logical timetable.

 

I would like to know more about that odd "51% sign"...

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Per ASTM 5798-11A approved this year, the current range of ethanol content can be 51 to 83 percent ethanol.  What can be up to that 49 percent non-ethanol make up can be anything the rack wants it to be as long as the fuel meets RVP.  No consideration for performance or emissions was given and the reason the ethanol industry supported it was stated as "we are going to take away the oil companies excuse for not blending E85". 

 

"Hydrocarbon blendstocks for meeting ethanol fuel blends performance requirements are unleaded gasoline, gasoline blendstocks for oxygenate blending (BOBs), natural gasoline or other hydrocarbons in the gasoline boiling range."

 

This leads to a combination of products that can boil at room temperature to high distillation gasoline as long as vapor pressure can be achieved.

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Per ASTM 5798-11A approved this year, the current range of ethanol content can be 51 to 83 percent ethanol.  What can be up to that 49 percent non-ethanol make up can be anything the rack wants it to be as long as the fuel meets RVP.  No consideration for performance or emissions was given and the reason the ethanol industry supported it was stated as "we are going to take away the oil companies excuse for not blending E85". 

 

"Hydrocarbon blendstocks for meeting ethanol fuel blends performance requirements are unleaded gasoline, gasoline blendstocks for oxygenate blending (BOBs), natural gasoline or other hydrocarbons in the gasoline boiling range."

 

This leads to a combination of products that can boil at room temperature to high distillation gasoline as long as vapor pressure can be achieved.

 

 

You know Steve that might actually HELP E85 Pricing when Ethanol is more expensive than Gasoline...IF of course under those circumstances that E85 is blended at 51% AND the lower price of the gasoline is actually factored in to the Retail Price.

 

 

Umm have to give that some more thought

 

 

 

 

 

 

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