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zucccchini

Why very few E85 Stations in Kentucky?

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:-[  Is there a tax or some sort of discouragement for E85  stations in Kentucky?  There are only 25 stations, the nearest to me is 51 miles and most are all in Lousiville an hour and a half away?

 

Where is there a good source of promotional material that is concise and to the point that I can leave with station owners who might be interested in getting E85?

 

If this is the wrong forum to be asking this, please let me know. ;D

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Z...

 

Growth Energy has a TON of resources on this very issue...

 

http://www.e85fuel.com/programs-for-retailers/

 

they have a list of what things they need to have as far as tanks and pumps to be able to sell it (check list), as well as a piece that explains how this will benefit their business (business proposal) as well as many other great resources.

 

You may want to play around there and look for relevant materials to pass on.

 

Please share your experiences.  There are a few on here that have done this, and some successfully ;)

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H.F.....so what I read sometime ago, and I do not remember where; that poor selling high test side of the pump can be simply filled with E85, the sign changed and you are in business...they cannot do that?

 

Thanks for the source, I will go there.

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Z...

 

I've read the same thing, where they swap e85 for premium... what the GE checklist is saying is that older pumps may need to have some internal parts swapped out, and some very old tanks may not be compatible.  Outlaw would probably have more specific info on that with his experience in the fuel retail field.

 

There are several here in NE that did just this.  So few people actually use premium gas these days, and they are finding that MANY more people use e85, so it is a logical choice.  Plus it attracts more "new customers", and since the fuel does get less milage (10-20% typically), they could count on getting those same customers to stop 10-20% more each year... meaning greater chance for more in store sales... which is where they make the money!

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HF, ,, the site you gave me is very informative but there is such a thing as "too much information"  If I gave some print outs to all the stations in my area, they would stop reading after the first paragraph.  I think I need to do some research on that site, gather only pertinent info to gain their interest and make up my own flyer.

 

I think all a retailer around here needs to see is the number of vehicles on the road that are Flex Fuel compatible, give them the latest price difference for gas and E85 and then refer them to their nearest supplier.  The questions I could answer would only be that my truck and car are Flex Fuel and I would buy it if it were closer.

 

Thanks for the prompt replies..   

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very true...  I think there was a link on here at one time to a site that had DMV data on the # of FFV on the road by county.  Though that data was a few years old, and the # of FFVs in those years has gone up greatly, there is bound to be current data.  You may ask your state DMV for this report.  Though they can't give you specific addresses of FFVs registered, there is no reason why the # of FFVs by county could not be shared.  Freedom of Information...

 

You need to tailor the information the the people you are giving it to.

 

One point to make with station managers is that right now there really is nothing to set them apart from any other convenience store/gas station out there.  There really offer the same products, at the same price, in similar locations... it is only by co-incidence that they get or don't get customers in their door.

 

By offering e85, they do several things... they...

1.  offer something that no-one else does which...

  a.  attracts new customers that other wise would have gone elsewhere

  b.  creates habitual customers that will buy their fuel (and other things) at their store and nowhere else

  c.  due to the decreased mileage, these habitual customers will be stopping for fuel at their store 10-20% more

2.  Will be able to state accurately that they are doing what is right for the country... environmentally, economically and patriotically... very good for image.

3.  They will be the innovators that will be pushing out to the lead, rather then following in the wake, hoping for scraps...

 

Personally, this would be one of my "dream jobs" would be to go around educating dealerships, gas stations, consumers, media about e85 and FFVs...

 

So far, I'm just an unpaid grass roots volunteer. ;)

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Well, HEY....find a supplier that would service our area...tell them how having a rep like yourself traveling about (with spouse...seeing the country! ;D) would benefit their bottom line.  That you, after spouting several accolades of extreme intellect concerning the representation of their product...would be happy to  represent them (pointing to a bare portion of the E85 map...Kentucky!) in areas needing flushing for possible retailers.  If you enjoy that type of sales then sell it to the suppliers and get paid for touring about in your E85 compatible motorhome.  ....if you can find one, I cannot. 

 

 

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touring about in your E85 compatible motorhome.  ....if you can find one, I cannot. 

 

thanks for the suggestion!  For a motor home... you are better off with biodiesel, as few if any of these are gas these days!

 

I found another link for you...

http://www.econ.ucdavis.edu/seminars/papers/357/3572.pdf  2007 paper from UC Davis... some cool info in there... on page 5...

 

"The Department of Energy estimates the cost of equipping a station to carry E85 at $50,000-$70,000 if the station must install a new underground tank, and at $5,000-$30,000 if the station can convert existing tank and must only retrofit or replace dispensers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory of the DOE distributes a publication entitled “E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85,” which lays out a cash flow analysis of an investment in E85 pump installation. (Johnson and Melendez, 2007) This publication considers many scenarios and a number of variables.

 

 

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