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Emerging alcohol fuel production trends

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Per my view of possible developments upon ethanol:

 

- The sugar cane model will gain. The model of harvesting energy stocks of starch or sugar and utilizing the whole plant for cellulose feed stock, and heat combustion. The production model to utilize the hot gas turbine electric generators and CHP co-gen technology with methane digester technology. 

 

- Agricultural fields to benefit from ethanol product stream affluent providing much needed field nutrition, irrigation liquid, active biological nitrogen stream, and organic matter.   

 

- Pellet fuel the most neglected of the bio-fuels should continue to gain popularity as truly a cost effective and efficient use of cellulose. My guess ethanol plants will enter into this business including waste ethanol. Northern buildings with high heating requirements should definitely evaluate pellet fuel if natural gas not an option. The install cost, complexity, and maintenance of geo-thermal a high barrier for low cost concerns and flexibility. Waste wood can be utilized for the ethanol market if supported by taxpayers or be utilized for wood pellets already commercially viable on its own competing readily with natural gas heating. What would be the best use? 

 

- MSW and municipal sewage waste reclamation business will increase in popularity as curb side recycling probably the dumbest idea ever to waste taxpayer money upon as well as dumping sanitary sewage water in rivers. A good trend appearing for value of this waste, although business will be hard pressed to give up the easy money as well as government bureaucrats, and workforce.

 

- Lighter weight smaller recyclable passenger vehicles containing more aluminum will operate much like the volt, utilizing engine generated electric power, but instead utilize smaller battery storage. This will max out the advantages of hybrid costs and provide a better bang for the buck. Plug in capability utilized to preheat vehicle to eliminate cold startup conditions, do some battery charging, or instead to provide some household or grid power and hot water heat. Ethanol fuel would fit this vehicle perfectly as well as plug in natural gas while at home. The car should be a whale more cost effective and practical. No need to spend $$ trillions upon reinventing the grid.

 

- Waste ethanol will continue its slow climb to production with little economic competition other than wood pellet fuel and the challenge of the one on one technical problem solving per waste stream requirements. 

 

- Farm scale or small local scale ethanol will gain in popularity. Ethanol fuel use upon agriculture will develop and quickly flourish. Denatured ethanol will be banished to scrap heap of outdated government regs pile.

 

- Ethanol production plants will develop an array of diverse products some of which will be electricity, bio-diesel, food, feed, crop nutrition, and hopefully take over municipal waste recycling.

 

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Oh, btw, waste ethanol should include waste energy. Meaning ethanol production should be encouraged to locate upon our electrical and industrial waste heat process streams where practical.

 

Sure, if ethanol would utilize coal for energy this would be a negative environment impact, but utilizing the large heat waste stream of coal generation of electric should be a large plus. Same for natural gas electric generation, or nuclear. 

 

Suppose the problem is legal liability. This would be a good place for central control to import "good" reg. A regulation that limits or controls legal jeopardy between two business locating upon same premises. The legal community doesn't like any regulation to minimize possible revenue or market share, but best to sometimes to go against valuable constituency. A cooperative business relationship would work well with ethanol.

 

Without some attractant or force the utility companies would not be interested as they have a mandated market share (no open market competition). Costs just past on. Ethanol would just make it complicated for them. They like all of us desire the easy life.

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You haven't mentioned ethanol from algae sources. This would be the biggest reason to

co-locate ethanol and coal electric facilities together.

  Many mutual benefits for doing this: available  space, remoteness, security ,

  rail infrastructure, water, mitigation of CO2, etc.

 

Not much news about this possible source.

Perhaps the most universal ,region independent choice , after MSW.

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Cessna,

 

that plant is just south of Council Bluffs Iowa (which is across the river from Omaha ;))

 

For those that have traveled the region... it is on I29 just south of where it meets I80.

 

The power plant is owned by Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway company.  The amount of corn loaded semis entering the place is tremendous.

 

I wasn't aware that they were using waste heat, but being that close to the power plant, it makes sense.

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The Southwest Iowa Renewable Energy plant is a 110 million-gallon per year corn dry-mill ethanol plant located south of Council Bluffs, Iowa on a 195-acre parcel of land.

 

The ethanol plant has a number of very unique marketplace advantages.  Being located near MidAmerican Energy®, Council Bluffs' electricity generating complex, allows SIRE to utilize alternative heat sources such as industrial steam.  In addition, the plant has access to five major rail lines and two major interstate highway systems.  Commerical petroleum tank farms are also located near the site.  As SIRE's strategic partner, Bunge® operates the nation's largest soybean processing plant nearby, as well as a Council Bluffs grain terminal facility offering additional operating synergies for the ethanol plant. 

 

The SIRE plant will use more than 39 million bushels of locally grown corn on an annual basis, and employs as many as 60 people.  Total cost of the business is estimated at $225 million.

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