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New Waste Whey Ethanol Plant Breaks Ground

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http://www.brighterenergy.org/18750/news/bioenergy/caseus-breaks-ground-on-cheese-waste-to-ethanol-facility/

 

Caseus breaks ground on cheese waste to ethanol plant

21 hours ago By James Cartledge  Send to a colleague  |  Print The state of Wisconsin has agreed a $1.9 million loan to support a biofuels project in the City of Greenwood.

The award came as Caseus Energy, LLC, via its subsidiary DuBay Biofuels-Greenwood, broke ground on a facility that will turn waste from the cheese production process into ethanol fuel using a yeast-based technology.

 

With a total investment of about $7.6 million, the plant is to have a production capacity of three million gallons of ethanol each year. It will also produce three million pounds of active dry yeast as a co-product each year.

 

State officials said the project will create 28 jobs. It is expected to be operational in the first quarter of 2011.

 

Speaking at the ground-breaking ceremony last week, Governor Doyle said: “We are moving Wisconsin forward in difficult national economic times by investing in our businesses and making them more efficient and competitive. With this funding, we will be able to help these companies establish plants and create good jobs for hardworking people in Wisconsin.”

 

Caseus Energy, which has its corporate office in Los Angeles, California, has field tested its proprietary process at a facility in Stratford, Wisconsin, since 2004.

 

The company is aiming to develop a series of plants around the country to make use of the by products as 10 billion pounds of cheese are produced in the US each year.

 

“The resounding support of the Governor’s office and the Department of Commerce have been absolutely pivotal for this project to go forward,” said Alex Reyter, CEO of Caseus Energy LLC.

 

“This funding shows what can happen when the private sector and the public sector work together to advance programs that benefit the environment, reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and imported fuels and create well paying jobs for America’s workers.”

 

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Wisconsin is a natural fit for Cheese waste ethanol..makes sense all around if they can do it profitably

 

Yup- we like our cheese hats here  :P

 

Seriously- it also eliminates the daily landspreading of waste whey on frozen farmland which can lead to runoff into streams.

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Waste to ethanol is a big market. Hard to get a handle on production potential. MicroFueler and Easy Energy has focused on this market. Key to success for small production, a franchise style support system with prefab mass produced lower cost process equipment.  MicroFueler has an interesting business plan, where the processor produces a sugar product to sell to captured consumers whom purchase their automated small batch process distillery equipment. The industrial supplier need not be handicapped with high regulatory load.  Consumers benefit from simple direct distribution supply chain. The system has maximum cost effectiveness to exploit nearby waste streams to ethanol. 

 

Around here fruit a possible market. Acres of grapes go unharvested often as sugar content is to high for Welshes standards. Also, tons of grape skins go to the compost pile. Tons of fruit and vegetable culls waste on the field/orchard. Lots of micro breweries and wineries have  ethanol waste stream potential. Surprising how pulping industries haven't bothered with ethanol production. Food processing, bakeries, distilleries, agriculture, and food preparation industry all fair game.

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Also, tons of grape skins go to the compost pile. Tons of fruit and vegetable culls waste on the field/orchard. Lots of micro breweries and wineries have  ethanol waste stream potential. Surprising how pulping industries haven't bothered with ethanol production. Food processing, bakeries, distilleries, agriculture, and food preparation industry all fair game.

 

very true.  I couldn't agree more... Think of all the wasted food that could be used...  I'm thinking of some of the industrial bakeries...  An "Easy Energy System" type machine could easily be set up to process waste/non-spec. pasteries...  With all that starch and glazed/powder... there is bound to be enough fermentables.... ;).  They could have a stored molasses tank for days when they don't have enough waste to process... 

 

They could also serve as a "disposal site" for smaller sites across town... have their own garbage truck doing a route picking up food waste from grocery stores and restaurants...  simply have a list of acceptable and unacceptable foods that can be disposed of this way... would keep these places trash bins from reeking to high heaven as well...

 

How much fermentable food/agricultural waste do you suppose goes wasted (no pun intended) each year?  How much ethanol production is being ignored?

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Waste alcohol alone was well over one billion gallons. A couple years ago visited the Leinenkugel's facility in Chippewa Falls. They stored spent distillery liquid in large outdoor tanks and paid a local farmer to pumped out once a week for disposal fees.

 

This "easy" figure is bandied about  "more than 100 billion gallons of organic fuel is thrown out". Dairy products, old chemicals, cardboard, paper, bruised and discarded apples. Karl Strauss Brewing Co., Gordon Biersch Brewing Co. and Sunny Delight plan to convert 29,000 tons of their liquid waste to ethanol. Soft drink waste and producers also a great waste stream.

 

 

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Fleebut also made a good point about having a "franchise style support system"...  would allow companies to profit from the booming ethanol market, but also gain in the valued experience and expertise, as well as scale of market from a larger company.  This franchise company would be able to purchase yeast and enzymes, as well as denaturent and equipment at good high volume discounts.  Much better then any one small 1-5mgy facility would.  They would be able to have a small group of chemists, engineers, technicians, pipe-fitters, book keepers... on staff at a centralized location to oversee this widespread network of small local production sites...

 

With any luck, they would also be overseeing the local distribution of ethanol to a comparable network of blender pumps in a 30 mile radius! 

 

With a franchise type system, any company, facility or farm that had a suitable waste stream could buy into this franchise system, and increase their revenue stream, while decreasing their waste disposal expense...  sounds almost too good to be true...

 

This doesn't even get into the jobs created!  Boosts to the local economy!  Decrease in money going overseas!  Decrease in money going to hostile countries!  Cleaner air!....  (well preaching to the choir I am again...)

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Yeah furball, I agree. The more wheys (pun intended) we can make alcohol fuel, there is no losing. Makes me want to seek out the brands of cheese that are made at the plants that use the by product for ethanol!

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