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Car & Driver alternate fuels article

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In the just arrived issue of Car & Driver magazine, there is a article about automotive alternate fuels titled "altfuelpalooza". It discusses clean diesels, biodiesel, synthetic diesel, CNG, hydrogen and of course, our favorite E 85.

 

They state that Brazil was able to achieve energy independence by making ethanol from sugar. In their opinion, making it from corn is a much more complex and energy intensive process. "If we could produce ethanol efficiently from easier -to-grow plants, ethanol could be a very good solution". Most of the US land is unsuitable for sugar cane / sugar beet production.

 

They added that the U.S. is using 400 million gallons of gasoline per day / 4,400 gallons per second. Any alternative fuel must be able to produce 1 million gallons per day..every day, consistently and efficiently. Until then its just a backyard project or experiment.

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Interesting...do you have a link to the article?  It would be a nice read.

 

Also, I'd never heard of that '1 million gallon per day' metric for 'alternative fuel'.  I guess that is something C&D came up with?  Don't know why they would set the 'bar' at 0.25% of daily consumption?  Either way, I think US ethanol capacity is nearing 13 billion gallons/year or 35.6 million gallons/day...edging closer to 10% of gasoline consumption and the 'blend wall' we keep talking about.

 

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I figured it'd be easy to find this article, with just a little searching, but no-go. I DID find these interesting articles tho. I think I've found enough to keep me busy for a few days.

 

http://www.caranddriver.com/features/10q2/the_future_of_the_internal-combustion_engine-feature

 

http://www.caranddriver.com/features/08q3/five_fuel-saving_technologies-feature

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C&D Guy,

 

Maybe you should look at the new Buick Regal 2.0L that will get within 5% the mileage on ethanol as it does on straight gasoline (expected to be the same in the next iteration,) 

 

and the Edison2 Car that's the only car qualified to win the $5 Million X-Prize (100 mpg in standard 4-seater car) <b>That Runs on E-85.</b>

 

EVERY Reputable Study shows that Ethanol emits at least 50% less pollutants than gasoline, and Corn ethanol requires NO more energy than sugar cane ethanol.  Actually, the last 4, or 5 months Corn Ethanol has sold on the world market for Less than Brazilian Cane Ethanol.  And, the Corn guys, unlike the Cane guys, have never been prosecuted for using "Slave Labor."

 

Fiberight is producing "cellulosic" ethanol from municipal solid waste, as we type, and state that they will be producing same for $1.60/gal when they reach full capacity.  Poet, and Novozymes say they will produce "cellulosic" ethanol from Corn Cobs for approx. $2.00/gal.  Inbicon is, already, producing ethanol from Wheat straw for approx $2.30/gal.

 

All of this with No Marines in Iowa, and no Carrier Groups on the Mississippi.

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Isn't the recent U.S. unleaded sales volume close to 100b gallon/yr. and corn ethanol well past 10%.

 

They always forget that corn is processed into two co-products of ethanol and distillery grain livestock feed. Some processes produce corn oil, food grade corn germ, and even a higher grade of live stock feed. Also, the dual processing of corn cob ethanol and corn starch ethanol produces a by product of natural gas  per bio digester and another fuel stream of solid bio. The dual process works to complement each other and produces enough energy waste to power both ethanol plant and additional energy sales. This most modern process pushes corn ethanol above sugar cane. 

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That's funny I was just over at C$D getting ready to post on the article ..

 

Read rufus post here  .. Buick Regal "almost" same MPG E85/Gasoline , Foberight ..trash to ethanol (already in production) x-prize etc..

 

welcome aboard !

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As far as "limited availability " of E85

 

 

Upper Midwest..

 

e85stationsstates.PNG

 

http://e85prices.com/e85map.php

 

 

There are 2349 Total E85 Stations in the United States | 1662 Total Cities selling E85 in the United States | 104 Blender Pumps - combination of E10 , E20, E30, E40 E50 and E85 in the US..you can run form La to New York and get E85 the entiure way.

 

But yes we do still have a lot of work ahead ..

 

GM wants 10,000 more E85 Stations ASAP.. a very doable number if the Industry starts focusing on high blends instead of E15 (additive blends)..

 

UL held up the Industry for a long time as well ..but blenders pumps, hoses all the parts were just approved last month. Thats huge as many places refused to do installs without UL's "blessing".. the usual insurance, liability reasons

 

So that's out of the way..

 

once we get the E15 issue settled next couple months I think we'll start to see E85 and higher blends (E20, E30, E40...E85) Station growth start to surge

 

GM, Ford are still pledging 50% of production FFV by 201 and 80% by 2015  ..As long as they see the commitment to the higher blends

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Keep the right perspective here.  The article was about alternative fuels of which E85 was one of them.  The US corn based E85 production largely goes to blending for E10. 

 

So how much actual E85 is sold in the US daily?  When we get close to the 1 million GPD of E85 then I think the automakers and distribution will follow.

 

At this point we don't know really how much E85 is in the mix vs the E10 additive market.

 

Another point is that we have just under 2400 E85 pumping stations nationwide.  In 2008 there were 116,000 stations in the US.  That's right about 2% of the distribution in numbers.  It's been estimated that until we get to 10% we have a serious uphill battle.

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