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dan45mcc

Ford Escape getting 88 MPG on E85 ..

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What does a plug-in Hybrid do to your home electric bill?

 

Well, the way I look at it, a gallon of gas contains ~125,000 btu / gallon -of which about 1/3 powers your car- and it now runs about $4/gallon.  So you're paying $4 for about 125,000/3 = 42,000 btu's of "go power"

 

Working backward with electric, a battery charger is ~80% efficient and your drive motor should be about 80% as well, so 64% overall.  To get your 42,000 btu's of "go power" you'd need 42,000 / 64% = 65,600 btu's of electricity.  That = about 19kW of electric power.  So pick your power rate...last I looked mine was .06/kwh... 10 cents makes easy math...about $1.90 in electricity.

 

So what ever you spend in gas, expect to spend roughly half in electricity...but plan to put money away for the inevitable battery replacement / motor or controller burn out, etc.

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Billyk, have you tried running any "intermediate" blends (e20 - e30) in your escape hybrid?  If so, what were the results?

 

Yes.  I have run several tanks of E30 or near E30 as I have to mix E85 with gasoline to obtain the mixture.  I got 34.6 mpg with my Escape along I-80 traveling from Auburn, Indiana to Youngstown, Ohio area.  I was averaging 34.8 mpg with 87 octane prior to my E30 fillup.  I have to admit, I travel leisurely at 60 mph on the interstate highway.  I'm convinced using E25-30 range is the sweetspot for dollars per mile.  It is just too bad, E85 is only offerred in a few spots in Western, Pa where I live.

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What does a plug-in Hybrid do to your home electric bill?

 

Well, the way I look at it, a gallon of gas contains ~125,000 btu / gallon -of which about 1/3 powers your car- and it now runs about $4/gallon.  So you're paying $4 for about 125,000/3 = 42,000 btu's of "go power"

 

Working backward with electric, a battery charger is ~80% efficient and your drive motor should be about 80% as well, so 64% overall.  To get your 42,000 btu's of "go power" you'd need 42,000 / 64% = 65,600 btu's of electricity.  That = about 19kW of electric power.  So pick your power rate...last I looked mine was .06/kwh... 10 cents makes easy math...about $1.90 in electricity.

 

So what ever you spend in gas, expect to spend roughly half in electricity...but plan to put money away for the inevitable battery replacement / motor or controller burn out, etc.

 

The hybrid battery are warrantied for 150,000 miles in the green states and 100,000 miles in other states.  I have yet to hear of an Escape Hybrid hybrid battery go south and there are vehicles (NYC taxi cabs) with over 200,000 miles without problems.  Then again, I am referring to the existing hybrid batteries and not the newest-still being developed--lithium ion PHEV version.

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Guest colchiro

I have yet to hear of an Escape Hybrid hybrid battery go south and there are vehicles (NYC taxi cabs) with over 200,000 miles without problems.   Then again, I am referring to the existing hybrid batteries and not the newest-still being developed--lithium ion PHEV version.

 

There are no known case of a Prius battery failing either.

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I have yet to hear of an Escape Hybrid hybrid battery go south and there are vehicles (NYC taxi cabs) with over 200,000 miles without problems.   Then again, I am referring to the existing hybrid batteries and not the newest-still being developed--lithium ion PHEV version.

 

There are no known case of a Prius battery failing either.

 

Yes, I am aware of several Prius batteries going south.  This has been reported on other forums.  The Prius hybrid battery is only "vent' air cooled while the Ford Escape Hybrid has it own heating and cooling system.

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With 183,000 miles on my Ford Escape Hybrid, I can not really tell any difference with the MPG figures compared to when it was new.   It is possible that a small change in battery capacity has occurred as I remember Ford buying a 200,000 mile Escape Hybrid and finding like 3% loss. 

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