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technology review article

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Blunt solutions after reading all 9 of those pages...

 

-Blender pumps

-cellulosic ethanol

-stover, solar, and manure power for the facilities

-run ethanol in the farm equipment for pete's sake!!! How many creative farmers already do it but don't get any press?

 

Economics of the situation are going to be different, but not all doom and gloom. Americans are good at finding discounts and making creative solutions, too. Prodding people to think is good, but you better have a reason and a solution in mind for doing it, IMO. People being so negative towards biofuels is what I don't get. You don't get much of anything back from gasoline, either. Why not consider options?

 

A "show me" attitude huh? That's about to be the fun part ;D.

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The 12% quote (ethanol can only replace 12% of fuel needs.paraphrasing)

 

is something I have an issue with..

 

Certainly I'd prefer that 12% was all e85 but no matter ...12% of ethanol IS significant ..that is lost market to the oil companies. Taking 12% of someones market is incredible significant imo.

 

12% Ethanol , 12% plug in electric , 12% hydrogen , ... nice diversity of fueling options means all Industries including Oil must run lean and compete for the consumers $$..means doing away with the monopoly and replacing it witha comeptitive enviroment = low vehicle fuel costs for everyone ..no matter your choice .

 

All of these Industries can be extremely profitable and at the same time consunmers get inexpensive fuel.    Think the beverage Industry .

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None of his "Facts" are correct.  None of them.  Zip. Nada. Zero.  God only knows why.

 

None of these asshats take Distillers Grains into consideration.  Field corn is used, almost totally, for livestock (primarily, cattle) feed; and Distillers Grains fed in a 30% ration yield 6% more weight gain than corn.  This means that the distillers are not only getting almost 3 gallons (at $2.20, today's price) of ethanol, but they'rre also getting $1.40 worth of distillers grains.  Poet's got the natural gas cost down to about a dime, and with 76 percent of the corn growers using no-till cultivation they're using about a nickel's worth of diesel for every gallon of ethanol produced.

 

Once you take DGs into consideration you get about 675 gallons of ethanol (150 bu/acre x 3 gal/bu x 3/2 - you get about a third of your corn back in the form of DGs, remember.)

 

I only got about three pages through it before I gave up.  Professor Emeritus my rusty ass!

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As for that 12% - That would be about 17 Billion Gallons.  I could, allowing for a 1:1 substitution for the distillers grains, get that out of 25 million acres.  What's that?  About 28% of 90 Million?

 

I don't get it.  Any fool can figure out that we're not going to power ALL of our cars with corn; but, why in the world discuss something as serious as energy in such a haphazard, uninformed manner?  It just gets "curiouser, and curiouser."

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I also find it very curious that none of these commentators are smart enough to even allude to the possibility that the farmer might (gasp) use biodiesel to fuel his farm machinery while growing an energy crop. As mentioned above in most industries if you take 10% -12% of a competitors market share you get a feature article in Business week about how you are turning the industry on its head.

 

As always the commentators view each solution in a vacuum and with no consideration to how it will drive other changes.

 

I am sure that the ethanol fuel plants are looking seriously at their costs and margins, but I get the impression that the only folks that are seriously concerned about a "glut of ethanol" are the opportunistic speculators that are shopping for another industry to rape.

 

Larry

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  What hasn't been described in the article are steps some of the ethanol plants have taken to

improve efficiencies of their operations , hence bottom line.  How many have begun to adapt

  on site cogeneration,  how many are installing fluidized bed systems, how many will be

including biomass as boiler feedstock, etc.  These may be significant gains for plant operations,

and involve costly retrofits, but in the end you get a much more self-sustaining design-- perhaps

more like how it should have been done originally.  How many ethanol plants are paired with feedlot

operations, or maybe powerplants, where waste heat from one , feeds the input of the other??

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