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greenhunter

E25-E50 Use in 2000 F150 5.4L

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I have a free source of 100% ethanol containing some trace amounts of acids.  I was wondering if my 2000 F150 5.4L with 130K miles would have any issues with a 25% to 50% self mixed ethanol blend and not converting the fuel management system?  Sounds like I may need to change synthetic oil and fuel filter more often?  I would still like to use regular gas when pulling loads.  I was thinking I could fill 1/2-5/8 tank of E10, then add the 100% ethanol.  I don't want to damage this great running truck.  Any comments, recommendations or lessons learned is greatly appreciated!  Thanks :)

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Greenhunter- in addition to Cessna's question I would add the question if this is from a small still or a regular plant producing fuel grade dehydrated ethanol (in other words < 0.8% h20). If the sulfur or ph are slighly elevated or off spec. you might want to use a 10W-30 diesel oil (if this viscosity is in range) and change oil at 5,000 miles (or less if you are short trip). The diesel oils will have a good TBN # for buffering acids- However- slightly elevated sulfur is not as likely to affect the oil as the much higher sulfur content of gas. More likely is that elevated sulfur or depressed ph may affect soft metals corrosion in the fuel system or injectors. Is the issue sufates, other sufur, or ph? Why do you feel this ethanol is out of spec? Does it contain the normal corrosion inhibitors?

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Thanks for the replies Cessna, Furball, and 1Outlaw!  ;D  The ethanol is commericailly purchased high purity 200 proof and is reformulated with some weak acids and then utilized for an industrial process.  I'll need to test for water and pH level.  There might be a trace amount of water but no sulfer in the ethanol solution.  My main concern is the acids.  The diesel engine oil is a good idea for buffering the acids.    I imagine the possible soft metals in the fuel system might be aluminum, copper?  I assume the F150 fuel system materials are designed for E10 fuel utlized in most states during the winter.  Once I test pH of E10 and then a mixture of the 20%, 30%, 40% ethanol, I'll let you know what I get for data.  If pH is close to E10, I'll probably try running a 20% mixture, then try 30%-40%  like Furball has done.

 

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See if they put any corrosion inhibitors in it- they may not have if it was destined to be industrial grade. Your soft metals are aluminum, copper, brass, etc--while corrosion can be accelerated (often where two unlike soft metals join) this will normally be at a very low rate unless the moisture content gets elevated and/or no corrosion inhibitor is present and the lower the alcohol content the lower the rate. The Brazilians ran 5% water content 190 proof straight for many years but at that level of water they would have had issues after a while with soft metals (besides not being able to blend it with gas). Sometimes industrial grade ethanol can be denatured with methanol- this would also accelerate corrosion. Your idea of checking PH is good (this might help you detect formic acids also-which can be created in the presence of excess water)- make sure you filter the alcohol to 2 microns to protect your injectors.

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