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gasisoutrageous

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  1. Like
    gasisoutrageous reacted to BJoe in New Thorntons-West Chicago   
    It's currently a fenced off lot where State Route 59 passes over State Route 38 (also known as Roosevelt Road) that has had a bunch of work being done to it over the last year, but now there's a Thornton's banner hanging up on the fence where it runs along Rt. 59.  Kinda looking forward to it since it's a mile or so from home and now that Thornton's has started selling E15 in the Chicagoland area, I have a much closer source to fill my 200 with E85 and for E15 to put in my XJ Cherokee!
  2. Like
    gasisoutrageous reacted to gasisoutrageous in Aaron's Corner   
    Today, I decided to check out the oil price, and as I expected, I nearly had a heart attack. 
    This is the lowest it has been in the 10 year history that NYMEX shows. This is unprecedented. I'm going to turn to the folks at Grand Rapids, MI based TheGasGame to explain this one. Ed Aboufadel knows his stuff with economics. I have met with him personally.
    We're showing prices that are unbelievably cheap here. I tell folks that they don't have to be old to remember cheap gasoline prices. I remember $1.60 from when I was, say, 10. I even have this photo that I happened to take when I was 10 with a camera I had just received for Christmas. (look real closely towards the bottom left. I was taking photos left and right, and wasn't necessarily aiming for the price sign)
     
    One of the reasons I got into E85 and more broadly, ethanol, was because it was being sold at prices I never thought I would see again. The first price I remember for E85 is $2.999/gallon, and this was in June 2012. The first price I paid myself was $3.099/gallon, and I thought that was incredibly cheap. This was the first tank of E85 I put in the Sebring, and I'm proudly using E85 over 3 years later. After the financial collapse of 2008 and the plummeting energy prices which closely followed, we slowly began to see prices recover through late 2009 and 2010. My narrative in 2012 and 2013 was that prices finally breached $3/gallon right after Christmas 2010, never to come back down (with a few exceptions here and there). I figured simply because I was 19 in 2012, that I would never see the cheap prices my parents and other adults I've talked to have told stories about. 
     
    Here is an interesting comparison. To begin 2012, Meijer was building a brand new store in a rather confusing area that is technically in East Lansing. It's technically East Lansing, but near Haslett and Bath Township, right on the Ingham/Clinton county line, and right outside of Meridian Township. Anyhow, I was extremely excited for this store to open. The station opened in April 2012, with the hypermarket a short time later. Here is a picture with the first prices, dated April 19, 2012. 
     
    Now check out what the prices looked like last Saturday.

    See the change?
     
    And so now, the question of viability comes into play. How is it possible for retailers to sell ethanol at such cheap prices? Furthermore, how is it feasible for ethanol plants to produce it for such cheap prices? These are questions that I don't quite have answers to. However, one thing I have noted is how high diesel prices remained as gasoline prices began to tumble. Kerosene prices also stayed high. The price difference between the different grades of gasoline has also gone up. Many folks figure that premium is much better for their cars, even if they only require regular. And with such cheap fuel prices, why not? Well, these higher midgrade and premium prices, higher kerosene prices, and higher diesel prices have helped to cushion significant losses for both ethanol-based fuels and regular gasoline. But now, diesel is below $2/gallon in spots. Kerosene just took a tumble - a full dollar per gallon in price - to $2.99 around these parts. So what now? How are retailers making up for losses? I can tell you now, at $1.55/gallon, nobody is making money (on the retail standpoint and further upstream).
     
    The other night, the dad and I got fuel at the brand new NUVU fuel station in Ionia, Michigan. He said out loud that he feels bad for fellow ethanol folks to sell at such cheap prices. We filled up at $1.199.

     
    I remember spending an entire evening in June 2013 driving out to Romulus (right by Detroit Metro Airport) just to fill up at $2.52/gallon. Two weeks later, I drove 7 hours one way to fill up at $1.749/gallon. June 2014 I drove out to Omaha to fill up at $0.85/gallon. Then, I get fuel for $0.499/gallon at the end of December 2014. And it was only discounted 30 cents/gallon. 

     
    Granted, I'm not a full-fledged economist with tons of credentials and decades of experience, but even those folks did not see the plummet in fuel prices coming. 
     
    Why have prices plummeted? OPEC has waged a full-out war on the world. In recent years, various factors have come into play that cut into OPEC profits. Many nations, including our own, have realized that dependency on someone else is not a good economic solution. We've undertaken numerous renewable energy drives - including ethanol - and have found oil deposits in our own backyards. And now, according to the last statistic I had heard, less than 1 in 6 barrels of our oil comes from an OPEC country. We produce that much of our own oil. And yes, renewable fuels such as ethanol and advances in battery technology have contributed a large part of that. But even still, OPEC should not be able to influence our fuel pricing and economy this way. And yet, they still are. So what happens going forward? We get dependent on petroleum again.
     
    This is as much of a double-edged sword as I've ever seen. Because of cheap fuel prices, folks have more money to spend. Aside from one of the weaker black-friday shopping days we've seen in a while, the price of fuel has been fantastic for business. Folks have more spending money. And they're going out more, using more gasoline. People are back to buying larger SUVs and trucks. Hybrid demand is not nearly what it was when prices skyrocketed in 2008. Flex fuel vehicle production is down a bit. And once folks are hooked on gasoline, we're right back to the embargo of 1973. We've undone decades of progress.
    But in the meantime, ethanol and other alternative fuels are having as hard a time as ever. I must say though, I'm impressed at how ethanol is holding its own. Demand for it is relatively strong, and the price is staying competitive in many markets. I see $1.35 for E85 out on the west side of Lansing right now, and I think that's expensive - but then I do a double take and remember thinking I'd never see anything below $2.99 again. I've said before how ethanol is extremely resilient. 2008 and 2012 were two of the toughest years imaginable for ethanol. The collapse of VeraSun, the droughts of both 2008 and 2012 (most notably the latter), and skyrocketing corn prices. And yet, ethanol held its own and emerged stronger than ever. We've seen a continual spike in the number of stations dispensing higher blends even with gasoline being so cheap. I must praise companies like RaceTrac for bringing E85 to states like Florida, Louisiana, and Texas. These are not the first states you'd think of when you think of ethanol. Now you could argue the merits behind that, and why exactly these retailers are doing that, but it is encouraging to see significant growth. So I have no doubt that ethanol will be able to weather this storm too.
     
    But it won't be easy.
     
    I got to thinking once I saw the basement-low price of crude oil earlier this afternoon. The plummeting price of gasoline is horrible for alternatives. I mean E85 must be priced competitively with gasoline to be able to sell well, and while in many areas it is - that still isn't enough for some folks to use it, many of whom insist that $1.55 for regular ain't that bad either. This is not the only problem on the horizon.
     
    This winter has been one of the lousiest I could think of. We're well below normal on snowfall and temperatures have largely been mild and above average. In my memory, nearly every time a winter has a powerful start, it is overall a lousy winter. And this winter has proven as such. We had an 8 inch plus snow here in Michigan back in November. It was great, and I loved seeing it. But in the time since, we have had very little. We ended the month of December with 1.9" of snow here. That is almost a record low. So I segway into my next area of discussion. Years with lousy winters tend to have hot and dry summers to follow. Look at 2011-2012. Perfect textbook example. My mom's 50th birthday in November 2011 was filled with freezing rain, rain, and 8 inches of wet snow. The rest of the winter was mild and saw much below average snowfall. In March 2012, we saw record high temperatures fall one after another. We even hit 86 degrees, in March! That was unprecedented, and indeed was the warmest temperature ever recorded in the month of March here in Lansing. The record warmth lasted for just over a week. Soon after, in one of what I would argue was the most predictable turn of events in meteorological history, much of the midwestern United States saw freeze after frost after freeze after freeze. Look at Traverse City, Michigan, for example. Some 90 percent of the cherry crop was decimated, because the tree flowers bloomed in the March warmth, and were then destroyed by the repeated freezes and frosts. The same thing happened to many other crops. Then, we had a summer that was as hot and dry as many folks could remember in their lifetime, unless they had been around for the Dust Bowl. Some 76% of the geographical area in the United States was under some level of drought at the July 2012 peak. And then, we hit 100 degrees here in Lansing for the first time in nearly 24 years. Not surprisingly, corn prices shot through the roof. Ethanol prices followed.
     
    My concern is that this could happen again in 2016. I'm going to say that it would be wise for ethanol producers to hedge their bets. Now I must put in the disclaimer that this is what VeraSun did in 2008, largely leading to their bankruptcy to close the year. But here's how it's different. VeraSun locked in corn contracts at $6.50/bushel. Corn prices are nearly half that right now - $3.50/bushel. Based on history, I believe it is unlikely for prices to fall significantly further. As it is, farmers aren't making much at this price. If 2012 is repeated, it is imperative to prepare ahead of time.
     
    I'll add more to this later as the thoughts come to me. I apologize for ranting here, but there is a lot I have been thinking about lately. Please, by all means, I aim to start a discussion - so feel free to reply.
  3. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from Black Knight in Aaron's Corner   
    Even I have been tempted, but I've said that I would sooner drink gasoline myself than put it in my car. When I see the gallon amount exceed the total sale, it isn't really that hard to stay strong anyways! Plus I remember thinking I'd never see a price below $2.99/gallon again.
     
    I'm glad to hear you're committed - especially in a state that doesn't have a direct-supply program like yells hose, like we do here.
     
    Funny you mention the heater option. I've read that it is included in vehicles sold in Brazil. At the start of last year, I had a Chrysler dealership install an engine block heater. It cost me $300 after buying the heater itself and having it installed. I will say though, that was some of the best $300 I have ever spent. All I do is plug the heater into an extension cord, and I never have any starting trouble. It increases engine efficiency, and decreases the amount of time I have to warm the car up. Thus, it saves fuel, and decreases wear and tear on the starter/ignition.
  4. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from Black Knight in Aaron's Corner   
    Today, I decided to check out the oil price, and as I expected, I nearly had a heart attack. 
    This is the lowest it has been in the 10 year history that NYMEX shows. This is unprecedented. I'm going to turn to the folks at Grand Rapids, MI based TheGasGame to explain this one. Ed Aboufadel knows his stuff with economics. I have met with him personally.
    We're showing prices that are unbelievably cheap here. I tell folks that they don't have to be old to remember cheap gasoline prices. I remember $1.60 from when I was, say, 10. I even have this photo that I happened to take when I was 10 with a camera I had just received for Christmas. (look real closely towards the bottom left. I was taking photos left and right, and wasn't necessarily aiming for the price sign)
     
    One of the reasons I got into E85 and more broadly, ethanol, was because it was being sold at prices I never thought I would see again. The first price I remember for E85 is $2.999/gallon, and this was in June 2012. The first price I paid myself was $3.099/gallon, and I thought that was incredibly cheap. This was the first tank of E85 I put in the Sebring, and I'm proudly using E85 over 3 years later. After the financial collapse of 2008 and the plummeting energy prices which closely followed, we slowly began to see prices recover through late 2009 and 2010. My narrative in 2012 and 2013 was that prices finally breached $3/gallon right after Christmas 2010, never to come back down (with a few exceptions here and there). I figured simply because I was 19 in 2012, that I would never see the cheap prices my parents and other adults I've talked to have told stories about. 
     
    Here is an interesting comparison. To begin 2012, Meijer was building a brand new store in a rather confusing area that is technically in East Lansing. It's technically East Lansing, but near Haslett and Bath Township, right on the Ingham/Clinton county line, and right outside of Meridian Township. Anyhow, I was extremely excited for this store to open. The station opened in April 2012, with the hypermarket a short time later. Here is a picture with the first prices, dated April 19, 2012. 
     
    Now check out what the prices looked like last Saturday.

    See the change?
     
    And so now, the question of viability comes into play. How is it possible for retailers to sell ethanol at such cheap prices? Furthermore, how is it feasible for ethanol plants to produce it for such cheap prices? These are questions that I don't quite have answers to. However, one thing I have noted is how high diesel prices remained as gasoline prices began to tumble. Kerosene prices also stayed high. The price difference between the different grades of gasoline has also gone up. Many folks figure that premium is much better for their cars, even if they only require regular. And with such cheap fuel prices, why not? Well, these higher midgrade and premium prices, higher kerosene prices, and higher diesel prices have helped to cushion significant losses for both ethanol-based fuels and regular gasoline. But now, diesel is below $2/gallon in spots. Kerosene just took a tumble - a full dollar per gallon in price - to $2.99 around these parts. So what now? How are retailers making up for losses? I can tell you now, at $1.55/gallon, nobody is making money (on the retail standpoint and further upstream).
     
    The other night, the dad and I got fuel at the brand new NUVU fuel station in Ionia, Michigan. He said out loud that he feels bad for fellow ethanol folks to sell at such cheap prices. We filled up at $1.199.

     
    I remember spending an entire evening in June 2013 driving out to Romulus (right by Detroit Metro Airport) just to fill up at $2.52/gallon. Two weeks later, I drove 7 hours one way to fill up at $1.749/gallon. June 2014 I drove out to Omaha to fill up at $0.85/gallon. Then, I get fuel for $0.499/gallon at the end of December 2014. And it was only discounted 30 cents/gallon. 

     
    Granted, I'm not a full-fledged economist with tons of credentials and decades of experience, but even those folks did not see the plummet in fuel prices coming. 
     
    Why have prices plummeted? OPEC has waged a full-out war on the world. In recent years, various factors have come into play that cut into OPEC profits. Many nations, including our own, have realized that dependency on someone else is not a good economic solution. We've undertaken numerous renewable energy drives - including ethanol - and have found oil deposits in our own backyards. And now, according to the last statistic I had heard, less than 1 in 6 barrels of our oil comes from an OPEC country. We produce that much of our own oil. And yes, renewable fuels such as ethanol and advances in battery technology have contributed a large part of that. But even still, OPEC should not be able to influence our fuel pricing and economy this way. And yet, they still are. So what happens going forward? We get dependent on petroleum again.
     
    This is as much of a double-edged sword as I've ever seen. Because of cheap fuel prices, folks have more money to spend. Aside from one of the weaker black-friday shopping days we've seen in a while, the price of fuel has been fantastic for business. Folks have more spending money. And they're going out more, using more gasoline. People are back to buying larger SUVs and trucks. Hybrid demand is not nearly what it was when prices skyrocketed in 2008. Flex fuel vehicle production is down a bit. And once folks are hooked on gasoline, we're right back to the embargo of 1973. We've undone decades of progress.
    But in the meantime, ethanol and other alternative fuels are having as hard a time as ever. I must say though, I'm impressed at how ethanol is holding its own. Demand for it is relatively strong, and the price is staying competitive in many markets. I see $1.35 for E85 out on the west side of Lansing right now, and I think that's expensive - but then I do a double take and remember thinking I'd never see anything below $2.99 again. I've said before how ethanol is extremely resilient. 2008 and 2012 were two of the toughest years imaginable for ethanol. The collapse of VeraSun, the droughts of both 2008 and 2012 (most notably the latter), and skyrocketing corn prices. And yet, ethanol held its own and emerged stronger than ever. We've seen a continual spike in the number of stations dispensing higher blends even with gasoline being so cheap. I must praise companies like RaceTrac for bringing E85 to states like Florida, Louisiana, and Texas. These are not the first states you'd think of when you think of ethanol. Now you could argue the merits behind that, and why exactly these retailers are doing that, but it is encouraging to see significant growth. So I have no doubt that ethanol will be able to weather this storm too.
     
    But it won't be easy.
     
    I got to thinking once I saw the basement-low price of crude oil earlier this afternoon. The plummeting price of gasoline is horrible for alternatives. I mean E85 must be priced competitively with gasoline to be able to sell well, and while in many areas it is - that still isn't enough for some folks to use it, many of whom insist that $1.55 for regular ain't that bad either. This is not the only problem on the horizon.
     
    This winter has been one of the lousiest I could think of. We're well below normal on snowfall and temperatures have largely been mild and above average. In my memory, nearly every time a winter has a powerful start, it is overall a lousy winter. And this winter has proven as such. We had an 8 inch plus snow here in Michigan back in November. It was great, and I loved seeing it. But in the time since, we have had very little. We ended the month of December with 1.9" of snow here. That is almost a record low. So I segway into my next area of discussion. Years with lousy winters tend to have hot and dry summers to follow. Look at 2011-2012. Perfect textbook example. My mom's 50th birthday in November 2011 was filled with freezing rain, rain, and 8 inches of wet snow. The rest of the winter was mild and saw much below average snowfall. In March 2012, we saw record high temperatures fall one after another. We even hit 86 degrees, in March! That was unprecedented, and indeed was the warmest temperature ever recorded in the month of March here in Lansing. The record warmth lasted for just over a week. Soon after, in one of what I would argue was the most predictable turn of events in meteorological history, much of the midwestern United States saw freeze after frost after freeze after freeze. Look at Traverse City, Michigan, for example. Some 90 percent of the cherry crop was decimated, because the tree flowers bloomed in the March warmth, and were then destroyed by the repeated freezes and frosts. The same thing happened to many other crops. Then, we had a summer that was as hot and dry as many folks could remember in their lifetime, unless they had been around for the Dust Bowl. Some 76% of the geographical area in the United States was under some level of drought at the July 2012 peak. And then, we hit 100 degrees here in Lansing for the first time in nearly 24 years. Not surprisingly, corn prices shot through the roof. Ethanol prices followed.
     
    My concern is that this could happen again in 2016. I'm going to say that it would be wise for ethanol producers to hedge their bets. Now I must put in the disclaimer that this is what VeraSun did in 2008, largely leading to their bankruptcy to close the year. But here's how it's different. VeraSun locked in corn contracts at $6.50/bushel. Corn prices are nearly half that right now - $3.50/bushel. Based on history, I believe it is unlikely for prices to fall significantly further. As it is, farmers aren't making much at this price. If 2012 is repeated, it is imperative to prepare ahead of time.
     
    I'll add more to this later as the thoughts come to me. I apologize for ranting here, but there is a lot I have been thinking about lately. Please, by all means, I aim to start a discussion - so feel free to reply.
  5. Like
    gasisoutrageous reacted to James48843 in GasBuddy   
    About damn time.  I sent a note to gasbuddy SIX OR SEVEN YEARS AGO asking for this function. 
  6. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from storky in GasBuddy   
    I'm all over the place with Gasbuddy. I find that a lot of stations that sell E85 don't have it marked as a feature, so I like to go in there and make sure the checkbox is selected. Oftentimes, I'll also see other edits that are badly needed - the address is incorrect or incomplete, the phone number is missing, other amenities available at the station aren't listed on Gasbuddy, the coordinates are off, etc. I'm extremely detail-oriented, and even the slightest glitch bothers me. The problem is, my access was cut off. I had been using the gasisoutrageous account for over 7 years, and then that happened. I use Gasbuddy as another method of finding the address and phone number, and it is imperative I have it for the coordinates.
     
    Yes, Gasbuddy is full of anti-ethanol hatred. Any time I post anything on the forums, it often gets a nasty or cynical response. There is virtually nothing on the local Gasbuddy forums. I stopped using Gasbuddy after Briggs and Stratton ran some ads saying "look before you buy", talking about the ethanol content. Plus, I don't use gasoline, so that site has been virtually worthless. Really, the only reason I bother with gasoline is to see the price spreads.
    But I would think if these folks really hated ethanol that much, they wouldn't waste their time on a site that advertises E10 prices, and would instead go to pure-gas.org. Ethanol-free isn't even an amenity option that shows up for stations on Gasbuddy.
     
    I've loved the recent improvements though to the Gasbuddy user interface. I think it has a lot of benefits that our site has been lacking. It's very user-friendly, shows prices on an interactive map, and it's easy as pie to upload photos. That way, if someone is wondering whether or not a station has E85, they can see photos of the pumps and the signs. Plus, duplicates are weeded out easily, and if a station has E85 but isn't listed, it can be added in a snap. If it does not have E85, you can simply take it out and leave it at that.
     
    With any new update, you usually have some bugs. I too have noticed that other stations which do not have E85 show up frequently. When I open the app, I see tons of stations that don't have the fuel. I go to the map, and I see the same thing there. But then, all I have to do is scroll around, and the non-E85 stations are weeded out. My main complaint though is that you can't see price history like you do here. That and I like comparing E85 to E0. Plus, E85 prices are not showing up on the iPad app or on the main website.
  7. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from Ethanol_Addict in New RaceTrac and RaceWay locations   
    I've been doing some more studying of RaceTrac's operations, and I think this topic is long overdue for some dusting off.
     
    RaceTrac has modified the way in which they do business. RaceTrac began adding E85 at any new or remodeled stores at the close of 2013. Looks like their first E85 store was the store on Ferguson in Dallas along with the store in College Park GA, right next to Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. However, around this same time, they began adding ethanol-free at some new and remodeled stores as well. So up until just a couple months ago, it was gasoline, diesel, and EITHER E85 OR Ethanol-Free at every pump. And compared to stores up here, RaceTrac stores are HUGE. It is nearly unthinkable to have 18-24 pumps at one station, except for the occasional truck stop that is well outside of densely populated areas. So in the same way that E85 is available at every pump at the stores which carry it, helping to dramatically increase sales, E0 was also available at every pump at stores which carry that. We're not talking at one pump, or at a pump which is either hidden or at the back of the property like what we have up here, but E0 at 24 pumps. From what I've seen, ethanol-free appears to be priced just above premium (93 octane) E10. At this point, I honestly find myself asking, why bother carry E10? Most stores had 87 octane E0 put in, but some RaceTrac/RaceWay stores got 89 or 90 octane E0. 
     
    Ethanol_Addict and I have been talking about this, and he brought up a good point. 89 or 90 octane are not very comparable in terms of cost-effectiveness with 87 octane. Many folks would think "well, I don't need 90 octane for my lawn mower or my boat" (so in a way, this is a double edged sword - it could also increase 87 octane E0 stores). But with a higher octane, folks can point to this increased octane as the reason for the increased cost. Now however, with 87 octane, people may be more likely to realize that the lack of ethanol is the reason for the price premium.
     
    But, in September, EA and I found what appeared to be an anomaly. I found a store that had just opened in Naples Florida, which added BOTH E85 and Ethanol-Free. I first asked the attendant if they carried E85. He replied that they do. So I then clarified and asked, "so you guys don't carry ethanol-free" - at which point he told me they carry both - half E85 on one side, and half E0 on the other. I was stunned. I called again later to verify. Ethanol_Addict did the same. Since then, we have had several more stores open which carry both. Honestly, I would rather a store carry both E85 and E0 than just E0. And when you're talking 12 E0 pumps and 12 E85 pumps, that's still more E85 access than almost any store up here would provide. We now have RaceTrac stores which carry both E0 and E85 in Naples, Daytona Beach, Bradenton, and Largo in Florida. Another store is in the works for the city of Wesley Chapel, expected to open soon. In Georgia, we now have two stores with this setup, and we also have two in Louisiana. 
     
    To top it off, RaceTrac has actually converted some stores to E85. I can honestly say that I have never heard of a store converting E0 over to E85, especially not a chain of this size. But so far, I have counted three of them. Stores in Sarasota Florida, and Norcross Georgia, have both converted their ethanol-free tanks and pumps over to E85. This to me is huge. This to me means that RaceTrac knows how to make E85 profitable and wants to sell the fuel.
     
    RaceTrac, much like Speedway in their expansion, has brought E85 in these setups (at 18-24 pumps in each station) to states which otherwise didn't have very effective E85 coverage, or had hardly any at all. For example, digging through the topics here on the forums, I found a topic where the poster was wondering when E85 would come to the Bayou State. Now, not only do we have several stations, but we have RaceTrac stores which have it at multiple pumps. I have also found a topic where someone was lamenting the lack of E85 in Louisiana's capitol city. 
     
    I am on top of multiple leads, and are checking in on them from time to time.
     
    Here is what I want to know: where the heck were these stores when I went down to Florida for the National Ethanol Conference in 2014?!? (I wouldn't mind going to the one in NOLA in February, but I'm unable to pay for it) RaceTrac has stores in Jacksonville, Daytona Beach, Melbourne, Orlando, and in Ocala. ALL of these stations would have made that trip immensely easier. In fact, I ran out of fuel right around where the Orlando store was built. 
     
    I encourage everyone to check out my RaceTrac spreadsheet, listing every store in the chain, and highlighting stores which have E85 as well as stores which have E0. You can find it by clicking here. In a separate post, I will remunerate the stores which have been added since the last update here. 
  8. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from storky in Erin Brockovich... and the untold story of how ethanol is being used to cleanup hexavalent chromium   
    I have gotten caught up in this movie because it is one of the funnier movies I've seen, alongside the moving backstory.
     
    The story is about how a single, divorced mother of three kids is able to bring $28 billion San Francisco based Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) to its knees. PG&E is a massive utility company that serves the state of California and surrounding areas. This company became infamous for the compressor station which operates in the unincorporated town of Hinkley, California, situated 1/3 of the drive from LA to Vegas. Chromium 6, also referred to as hexavalent chromium, was used as a rust inhibitor. PG&E used piston engines to run water through the compressor station to keep it cool. As mentioned, the Cr-6 kept the water from creating rust. When they were done with the water, PG&E employees would dump the water into holding ponds next to the plant. Unfortunately, the plant employees skipped the step of lining the ponds when the practice of using hexavalent chromium at this plant began in 1952. As such, the water seeped into the ground. Hinkley is well within the Mojave desert, and the residents are highly dependent on well water.
     
    So what is the big deal?
    Let's just say it's safer to drink gasoline. I'm not kidding. Repeated exposure to hexavalent chromium, often through the form of water, is known to cause chronic headaches, nosebleeds severe enough to drench towels, bone and organ deterioration, kidney failure, nearly any type of cancer, and more.
     
    How does ethanol figure into the picture?
     
     
    PG&E will be paying for this for decades to come. In the original 1996 settlement, PG&E was ordered to pay the 634 plaintiffs a total of $333 million, which remains the largest in a single direct action lawsuit in United States history. Through additional settlements and legal trouble, PG&E has paid a combined total of $800 million due to their use of Cr-6. And now, Pacific Gas and Electric Company is facing a second lawsuit from residents of Hinkley not involved in the original lawsuit.
     
    Erin Brockovich continues her work, having dedicated her life to fighting hexavalent chromium. Ed Masry, the lawyer for whom Erin was working as she began her career, passed away in 2005 from complications due to diabetes.
    Link to the ethanol story: http://www.sbsun.com/general-news/20130709/hinkley-what-is-pge-doing-about-chromium-6-in-the-communitys-well-water
    Link to the second lawsuit story: http://www.sfgate.com/science/article/Toxic-plume-spreads-PG-amp-E-faces-2nd-Hinkley-4688046.php
    "plume" refers to the region of affected groundwater.
     
     
  9. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from storky in 5,000 New E15/E85 Pumps coming   
    I hate to be cynical, but I'll believe it when I see it.
     
    As I stated when I spoke in front of the EPA back in June, my biggest concern is now how all of these stations have 10-12 fuel pumps, with E85 at only 2 of them. If you price E85 even a little bit better, and put it at more than one set of pumps, you'll sell so much, your head will spin. I guarantee it. That's something I'd like to see change. Thanks to Meijer and Speedway, northern lower Michigan, and now the Upper Peninsula, are slowly beginning to fill in. This has been a number one concern of mine from day one, and it's slowly being addressed. Slow and steady wins the race. Meijer has announced plans to build stores in the Canadian border town of Sault Ste Marie, in the north central UP town of Marquette, and down near the southern tip with Wisconsin, in the town of Escanaba.
     
    Say, ya been to da UP eh?
  10. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from GT-Labs in Howdy   
    No worries, we'll keep the pic safe for ya. This run on E85?
  11. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from storky in Ethanol $1.64 on the Chicago Board of Trade   
    Just wait for gasoline demand to increase as a result of the lower prices, and for ISIL to take over Baghdad or key oil facilities.
  12. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from Ethanol_Addict in New RaceTrac and RaceWay locations   
    Speaking of RaceTrac adding E85, and that being refreshing, we have two more listings.
     
    They have added a ton of E0 stores in Florida, and I have just found a couple E0 stores in Louisiana. However, in Orlando, a new RaceTrac location has opened with E85.
     
    RaceTrac
    350 Sand Lake Road
    Orlando, FL
    407-856-7897
     
    I also had received a lead on a new RaceWay location in Texas. Someone had listed the wrong number on the GasBuddy listing, and both Ethanol_Addict and I kept getting someone who had no idea what we were talking about. Thankfully however, I got the right phone number, and confirmed that it does indeed carry E85.
     
    RaceWay
    11801 SH-6 South
    Sugar Land, TX
    281-565-0445
     
    As the ol' Dan would say, now listed and ready for prices!
  13. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from Steve-O in MFA in Harrisonville, MO   
    The listing has been closed; thanks for the update. I kind of want to go to MFA HQ and scream at them.
  14. Like
    gasisoutrageous reacted to Fuelinggood in Kum & Go to offer E15, more E85   
    In case you missed the good news this morning, Kum & Go will begin offering E15 in Iowa this week. This was part of a more major announcement, which included 65 total new E15 stations in 7 states. Three of those states will be new for E15.
     
    http://www.ethanolrfa.org/news/entry/kum-go-to-introduce-e15-in-seven-states/
     
    Keep in mind, if these stations do not already offer E85, they will. Until E15 is offered by fuel terminals, the most efficient way to offer E15 is by diluting E85 at the station with E10.
     
    Robert
  15. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from Ethanol_Addict in New E85 stations I found today   
    Coming back from applying for my first passport in Detroit, I decided to get off the Lodge Freeway to check the price for the Mobil on McNichols. Before I could merge back on, I saw a Marathon that had E85 in their sign, so I stopped in and filled up! $0.54 spread ain't too bad.
     
    Marathon
    18420 James Couzens Freeway
    Detroit, MI
     
    Found a Mapco in Tennessee as well.
     
    Mapco
    7002 City Center Way
    Fairview, TN
     
    As the ol' Dan would say, now listed and ready for prices!
  16. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from storky in Updated "Consumer Choice Report Card" numbers   
    That's nothing my friend. The Sunoco about 15 miles to my northeast, in Perry, has 20 gasoline only pumps, a couple of which have diesel, and then a separate truck bay for truckers to get diesel. E85 is in a lone part of the property, behind the truck scales, and is also often blocked by fuel deliveries. It's 150 feet from the store. They just recently added a street light above the pump.

  17. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from dan45mcc in New SuperAmerica E85 stores   
    Negative... I actually already called and confirmed they do indeed have it.
  18. Like
    gasisoutrageous reacted to TD in RFA acquires E85Prices.com   
    (Don't let him forget to show you the secret handshake.)
  19. Like
    gasisoutrageous reacted to dan45mcc in RFA acquires E85Prices.com   
    Thanks everyone !    
     
    Going to be nice to have  a little extra free time.. some of us will be working a little more though..umm Aaron I know your busy but can you take care of these new E85 Stations please 
     
     
    http://e85vehicles.com/e85/index.php?/topic/6845-a-host-of-new-thorntons-locations/&do=findComment&comment=44987
     
    Really happy to see Aaron officially on board.. you'll do a great job promoting E85 and keeping the Station database up to date
     
     
    I think its going to be good for everyone.. I was falling behind on a lot of things for the websites..just not enough hours in the day and I was running myself down trying to make more time .
     
    so with the RFAs resources they can split/ hire out the work load..get caught on the things we are behind on ..like updating the E85 vehicles pages ...getting the APPs updated etc.. 
  20. Like
    gasisoutrageous reacted to dan45mcc in RFA acquires E85Prices.com   
    And Congrats to Aaron !  Very smart move to bring Aaron on board 
  21. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from dan45mcc in BP Station in Chelsea, MI back to Marathon   
    Hey Dan, just want to shoot you a reminder about this one and also the new station I found: http://e85vehicles.com/e85/index.php?/topic/6761-new-speedway-e85-additions/&do=findComment&comment=44950
  22. Like
    gasisoutrageous reacted to mjsilverado in Meijer Discussion   
    South Lansing Meijer appears to now have E85 priced only 35 cents less than 87 today. Still cheaper cost per mile wise vs 87 for me. 12% less fuel economy after about 1200 on E85.
  23. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from TD in E85 should be the wave of the future if the ethanol industry can understand it's product and market it for what it is.   
    I agree almost 100% with what the guy is saying here. When I was down in Florida for the ethanol conference in February, I had a guy in a newer BMW convertible pull up to the other side of the E85 pump next to me and use E85. I started talking to him and he told me that he blends in enough E85 to bring the octane up to 100. That put a smile on my face.
     
    Whether or not these folks appreciate the fact that E85 is renewable, domestic, and cleaner burning, they certainly appreciate the power. After all, that's why I decided to go for the Charger when I saw it for sale (that, and it was an impulse buy... but that's neither here nor now). Two years ago, I thought it was incredibly wasteful to slam on the accelerator pedal. If you had told me the 0 to 60 in your car was 7 seconds, I would have said "whoopty-freaking-doo". It was not a virtue to me. When I would slam on it, I would hear dollar signs, not performance.
     
    But now, I've done a 180 on that. I appreciate the power that comes with E85. It's not a night-and-day difference, but I know the additional horsepower is a selling point for some folks.
     
    The ethanol industry has done almost nothing to cater to this demographic, and that should change. I got into ethanol because of the fact that it's renewable, far better for the environment than oil could ever hope to be, does not support geopolitical tension, etc etc, but I can't complain about the power.
  24. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from Ethanol_Addict in Aaron's Watchlist   
    Done, added to the list. Since it's difficult to transfer spreadsheets from my laptop over to my iPad, I'm recreating these databases on my iPad from scratch. Also adds some mobility.
     
    I'm working on the RaceTrac list as we speak.
  25. Like
    gasisoutrageous got a reaction from dan45mcc in With E15, comes new E85 - New Stations   
    Whoa, Minnoco is selling E85 now???
     
    I don't know what stands out at me more... Minnoco, or the phrase "several hundred more are in the works".
     
    Robert, send me a message when you can.
     
    Dan, I'll help you out with coordinates and phone #s when I get out of work at 2100 hours.
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