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cessna

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Posts posted by cessna


  1. I probably should have waited till 10,000 miles like the book said but always try to be a little early----even with my TDI that said 10,000 I'd do the 7 or 8,000. The 2001 Taurus always had an ethanol smell also and that's not really getting my nose right in it either. Just lying on the ground under the car reaching for the drain plug----my hearing isn't the best but I can smell a cigarette from a car passing by when I'm on my bicycle. :D


  2. Maybe I wasn't clear about the TDI post. I don't have it anymore but always took biodiesel along in the trunk to blend. Sometimes even with the small diesel nozzle it just wouldn't take fuel and just spit back. One time I filled at a pump that just had a big nozzle for semi's and used a funnel and jug to get the diesel into the jug to pour into the car. Anymore I always like to have a jug with me when I travel and this car with over 20.000 miles has had just about all E85.


  3.  

    Might want to congratulate them Cessna on their hard work

    Will do. Sure glad I put some money in that plant. I wasn't an original investor----I bought shares from unhappy people in early 2008 not long before everything tanked but they've done well in the mean time. They main reason I did was because I liked the methane from the next door landfill for part of the process fuel.

     


  4. I got E85 at Primghar a few days ago and it comes from Siouxland Energy. The Co op that owns the convenience store sends their tandem fuel truck over to the ethanol plant and drops E85 into the C store tank and dispenses through a blender pump. About as efficient as it gets. I still remember a couple of years ago watching a semi tanker along side a rail car transferring diesel into the truck at a Co op grain loading facility. For some reason it was hard to get out of the Sioux City pipeline terminal so the rail worked. Could easily ship ethanol to far away points by train and have four trucks per railcar load and haul directly to a blender pump.


  5.  

    Don't believe we'd get an honest answer about production costs from the oil industry,  at least not more than the base

     

    (floor)   price they'd accept for domestic crude,

     

    Here's something to think about and I don't know if it's true. I read an article about the kidnapped girls in Nigeria. The jist of the story is if it is really just made up and an excuse for the USA to set up some more bases to help secure Nigeria for our interest. Does it cost anything to set up shop in other countries? Remember, there's oil in Nigeria.

     


  6.  

    They will be brining in 75 car unit trains of corn from the midwest

    Lots of poultry and some pork to eat the distillers grain in VA and MD plus it's close to where the ships load for export. Maybe a few dairies to eat wet distillers also.Don't know if any of you pay attention to this, but the record corn yield of 454 bushels per acre was made at Curles Neck farm this year which is right across the river from Hopewell.


  7.  

    Cessna I don't belive anyone paid 5 to put the ethanol in actual blending..... I do believe that 5 was paid to push the market higher so they could sell into a market they were working to push higher

    Yeah I believe in conspiracy too but he said it was about the train being slow to deliver actual product. He said the crude oil unit trains are what the RR really likes and ethanol comes second and then they don't want to mess with anything but unit trains of ethanol. If you're a small plant you were in a bad way. When it comes to conspiracy, he indicated there was more chance of that the way the ethanol plant marketed our ethanol for such a cheap price and maybe a few individuals got to split the cream.

     


  8. Went to the ethanol plant meeting last night. You can look at charts all you want but there are so many different deals and variables that I'm not sure the charts really tell the story. I happened to sit next to the guy that used to market the ethanol for this plant and is also an investor. There has been some big changes in management and he no longer markets for this plant but still does for many other plants so knows the ropes. He asked where the 43 cents a gallon profit or in other words $17 millon in lost revenue for the year went. Were they that poor at marketing or???????? something funny going on. Also found out there was some $5 ethanol sold not long ago because somebody needed it really bad. Like he said, "this is America where anything can happen".


  9.  

    Eric Draitser said in an interview with Press TV that Russia, which supplies more than one third of Europe’s gas, is a “great energy power” that “may decide to stop accepting US dollars to settle debts and US dollars for its energy reserves.”

    “All of this is sort of a doomsday scenario from a financial perspective; but, it is all very much a possibility if the United States and Europe” escalate the situation, the analyst said.

    Draitser held out the possibility of euro and dollar depreciation, which would, in turn, trigger “unrest in global markets.”

    The analyst said Russia is in a position to make it harder for Europe to have access to gas, adding, 

    “It would fundamentally change the geopolitical calculus not only of the Europe but of the global economy more generally.”

    http://www.lewrockwell.com/2014/04/no_author/is-an-energy-war-looming/

     


  10.  

    warmongering Russian president Vladimir Putin

    Not sure you want to go so far as to say that. We're the ones that helped stir things up to get Yanukovych ousted. That and Ukraine had a very big unpaid natural gas bill and Russia had the best deal to solve that. Interesting that Russia is interested in the Gulf since they're swimming in oil over there. You know that a lot of Afghanistan's problem is that it is where a pipeline needs to be run and the West sure wants to control that area. Sure tough when you have real estate that somebody else wants.

     

     

    Russia agreed to slash the gas price for Ukraine in a December bailout that was widely seen as a political reward for Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych after he backed away from integration agreements with the EU to instead cement closer ties with Russia.

     

     

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