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CWGrizzwold

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About CWGrizzwold

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  1. The pump is now open. Current price is $2.29 which is about 30 cents cheaper than regular at the same station. As promised, here are some pictures of the new pump at the Shell station in Cary, NC. I spoke to the manager while I was there and asked him when it was going to open and he said he didn't have a good idea. He is waiting on the State paperwork to be finished and permit to be issued. Everything is ready to go otherwise. I would ignore the price atop the pump in the pictures as that can't be correct. http://home.roadrunner.com/~clarkotte/E85_Pump_Cary_NC_2.JPG[/img]
  2. We botched (simple Microsoft Excel error) a map change on the PCM and when we ran an emissions test prior to the competition we were putting out very high levels of CO. So much so they didn't have a "bin" on the emissions stand calibrated high enough to correctly measure just how much death we were putting out. Good thing we had a few other calibrations on extra ECMs which were much closer to what we wanted.
  3. I agree that 7 seconds was a tad too long, but keep in mind this was only our second year doing this (we had the Malibus in 1998). We used a secondary injector and an air inlet heater and it worked wonders for us. Those trucks were really hard to start and we had very little test time before we showed up as we were fresh out of a cold chamber anywhere near Lincoln, NE. The kicker was in 2000 when GM brought a Tahoe there and they only thing they did was reflash the PCM and they killed us in every category. We had access to a limited amount of maps in the PCM, but once again the number of flashes we got were limited. Air inlet heaters go a long way. So does keeping the fuel rails and a small amout of fuel (close to the injectors) warm. We used fuel rail heaters in 2000 but our battery got drained sometime before the cold start which didn't allow the inverter to kick on to power the heaters. Lessons learned the hard way.
  4. No, on the first sheet those are all scores out of the max available at the top of the column. For cold start the max points were 25 which went to UT-Austin with a time of 3.8 seconds (found on the second sheet). We started in 7 seconds and were awarded 22.6 points. There is no need to pay attention to the first sheet. All the data you guys are looking for is on the second sheet. Cold start was a pain in the butt as you are all well aware of. I would have to look at UT-Austin's SAE paper to see how they tackled it.
  5. Actual MPG wasn't calculated until we did the "official" run on Black Lake at the Milford Proving Grounds and at the facilities in Canada. They also did some dyno work. Here are the results from the 1999 EVC. The second tab on the sheet has the fuel economy information. I need to find the 2000 data as I don't have it electronically, but I know I have it up in the attic. http://home.roadrunner.com/~clarkotte/99EVC%20Scoring.xls
  6. Sorry Dan, I should have given you the actual address. Here it is. 902A US HIGHWAY 64 W APEX, NC 27523-7186 919-462-8332
  7. I will try to get a picture once the shipping plastic and everything is taken off of it. It sits right in the middle of the main pumps and looks kind of heroic! Yes, I might be the guy that you are looking for as I headed up the '99 and '00 Ethanol Vehicle Challenges for UNL. I just looked and the website I maintained is still up and running on their server (don't ask me how). Some of the links are broken but most of the stuff that pertains to our vehicles is still there including our two SAE papers. http://www.engr.unl.edu/~ethanol/ I will dig up some more information regarding before and after fuel economy. Keep in mind everyone's conversions were different. We took a balanced approach that didn't primarily focus on fuel economy. We wanted good power as well as good cold startability. It was a great project for us (being from Nebraska and the heart of Ethanol) and we all had a ton of fun.
  8. The Shell station (which is also a McDonalds) at the corner of Lake Pine Road and US Highway 64 is adding an E85 pump (still haven't taken the wrapper off of it yet). I drove by it today after picking up some McDs and darn near stopped, got out, and kissed it. I worked on ethanol and ethanol vehicles (Ethanol Vehicle Challenge) all throughout college at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, but never thought I would see a public pump this close to my house in North Carolina! Now I'm kicking myself for not getting the FlexFuel option on my '07 Avalanche.
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