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jeepn30

Tesla Model 3

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This could be an interesting shift in the electric car paradigm.  Looking at the preorders, the demand is there.  I have followed this company before the Model S even came out.  I am  still amazed that they have brought an electric car to market, despite efforts of big oil and franchise dealers in this country.  I test drove one a couple years ago, and must say the Model S was phenomenal.  I just couldn't justify the price of one.  Upscaling production for the Model 3 will be their biggest test.  They have made good on what they said they were going to do so far (Roadster, Model S, Model X), although they have not made any of their deadlines.  I put my deposit down on one before the online launch on March 31st, as I feel I will be in the market for a car when it finally comes out.  I don't expect to see mine until 2018 or 2019, and I'm fine with that.  Regardless of outcome, this will be their most important car in their company, as it will make or break Tesla in my opinion. 

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I really like the idea of owning a Tesla, but the models with all the features come out first (expensive) so the one I could afford would be years from first launch.

 

The Tesla quality control also concerns me. They haven't even reached the quality that the Big Three had in the 90's yet (before imports forced them to improve).

 

OTOH, the Bolt looks interesting and will be available much sooner. I'd like my first EV to have closer to 300 miles of range.

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Interesting automobile model if..the pricing holds true and the company is able to ramp up greater production.   I do not know where one obtains reliability reports on a company that doesn't have many vehicles on the road.  Are the reliability issue related to constant software upgrades and/or hardware?

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Just a reminder that the range of these vehicles will decrease during the cold winter months.   For some of us this comes from experience.    I would rather stick with a PHEV than a pure electric vehicle--at this time--due to the limited number or rapid recharging locations.

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Also recognize that the internal combustion engine is at its most inefficient and produces the greatest amount of emissions when it is not at normal operating temperature. If your PHEV all electric range is just short of your commute, you get a cold startup. Your engine would be subjected to the worst scenario for an internal combustion engine:  fuel washing lubricant from cylinder walls; production of soot through incomplete combustion and poor response to throttle input.

 

Since PHEV's are derivatives of hybrids, most of the cold engine cranking issues are mitigated. Like cold cranking to 1200 rpm in 1/4 second and fuel prohibition until minimum oil pressure is reached. Release of warm coolant into intake manifold from a thermos storing warm coolant from last trip. Exhaust system Soot Trap active until the engine warms. Valve timing configured for speedy warming as opposed to preferred throttle response.

 

Being the member of a Ethanol enthusiast group and an experienced ethanol user, it is important to note that increasing alcohol concentration increases warm up time.

 

I know that BEV's, battery electric vehicles, allow one to program cabin heating while on a charger. I would assume that capability exists on PHEV's. The batteries also heart up while charging. So the issue of reduced capacity becomes problematic only if the car is not on a charger when parked. 

 

HEV's use cabin atmosphere to heat and cool batteries which returns them to their normal capacity minutes after the engine reaches normal operating temperature. Since engine use is optional, I am unsure if this capability exists in a PHEV. Would heating the cabin sufficiently replenish battery capacity and if so, how much driving range is lost to heating the cabin and batteries?

 

 

 

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Plugging in for cold weather operation has always been a preferred practice. Tank heaters or block heaters have proved their worth for cold starts. The device lowers engine's emissions, improve the engine's efficiency, and provides for quick cabin heat. So, why hasn't the practice become popular? Modern car technology has improved so much the need is gone. Modern lubricates and engine design make the engine component the most durable section of the car, so the motivation to yet get more longevity is gone.

 

Plugging in will be a negative option for most shoppers looking for the best solution to their day to day car transportation needs. Conversely, the mild hybrid should become popular due to low cost option that will maximize MPG.. But, most importantly, whenever the consumer fuels up they should be offered higher blend ethanol to save money and improve environment. That option will prove out to be the most powerful improvement for environment and will be as natural as shopping for the best deal. The improvement comes with no convenience penalty and actually save the consumer money. 

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The Mahle igniter, should improve cold start emissions. With current spark plug technology, the system has weak power. Meaning the voltage is high, but amperage low. Old coil and point systems had more energy from battery power. This generated more heat at the spark plug, but unfortunately was hard on metal components. The Mahle igniter is multitude more powerful of an ignition device. Also, the small igniter chamber is the only environment that needs rich fuel supply of combustion air. This should drastically cut down on cold start emissions. Ethanol blends will cut down sooting, but must be above E15 for the benefit. This is also good for the direct injection engine as higher ethanol blends will keep the valve carbon buildup at bay. 

 

My guess the short trip and especially the cold weather short trip will be addressed within operator and auto control inputs. If the short trip is routine the operator may purchase a plugin in hybrid with proper battery power to get the job done without engine operation. This would be a small percentage of owners concerns, but would be highly prized with the ones that need such operation. 

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My battery range is about half in the winter and best with temps approaching 80° (then decreases due to AC use for comfort and battery cooling) so about 40 miles on a good day (sensible driving). I could do better, but what that's not as much fun.

 

The Volt automatically starts the engine for cabin heating at temps below about 20° (depending on model year). Since it's for comfort, not battery life, to defeat that some of us have installed an ERDTT (Engine Running Due To Temperature) mod which skews the outside air temp to much warmer so the engine doesn't run until closer to 0° F. Of course that makes the outside temp indicator on the dash about 30° warmer too and it isn't linear.

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A Ford C-Max PHEV owner will "cool" his cabin and batteries prior to starting the engine during the hot summer months in an attempt to max EV distance.  Yes, this is done why the PHEV is on the chager.   Since I don't have a PHEV but a HEV that used outside air and a coolant system for thermal regulation, I don't know how well this works.

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