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New E85 Meijer Additions


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#61 Dan M

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Posted 18 July 2006 - 11:57 AM

The first of the 20 Stations Meijer is installing this year opens Wed in Warren Michigan

Meijer will open its first E85 fuel facility in Michigan on Wednesday in Warren as part of a push to offer ethanol fuel at 20 Meijer stores statewide by the end of the year.

The Warren Meijer gas station sits beside a store that opens next month at 12 Mile and Mound, said Stacie Behler, a Meijer spokeswoman.

Behler said the Grand Rapids-based retailer is finalizing the list of other stores to get the E85 pumps.



http://www.freep.com...0/1019/BUSINESS

#62 Stephen P

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 04:10 PM

Meijer annouced today it will be opening 20 stations in Indiana.

http://www.wishtv.co...y.asp?s=4891927

#63 Wyldkardde

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 11:34 AM

I'm not totally sure exactly how I feel about the whole "desert county" thing, but I honsetly believe that if E85 takes off well enough now, it can provide a much needed correction mechanism for the oil industries.  What I'm seeing as a possible future history of E85 could go something like this.

A good portion of stations start providing enough access that demand for the product starts mandating it at other stations so that E-85 is available to most people.  Then IF the price difference is enough, say 15% -25% different, enough people are going to look into this to see that $500 in conversion costs could be possibly recouped by someone in 1-2 years at a Unleaded Regular price of about 2.75, and just sooner if gas goes higher. 

This is the point where I really see that people will start converting, and as the Oil companies don't seem to like to play the whole "supply & demand" game in any way we were taught in high school economics class, instead of dropping their price in order to compete with ethanol products, initially they will raise their prices to maintain their inflated profit margins. 

When this happens, the masses are going to start coming the way of the early adopters, and we are going to start seeing a big shift towards using E85, where instead of looking for a station that does have E85, it will be hard to find one that doesn't.  As long as new Ethanol production keeps up with demand, and the tech keeps advancing to drive down costs, the price difference should begin to increase, as production and transport costs continue to go down.

Finally, as Oil companies are starting huge cutbacks in their companies in order to survive, much like the auto companies are doing now, gas price will start to come down again, but in essence, this too will probably bring down the price of E85 again, as the gasoline component of E85 will also become cheaper.  Its at this point that the two fuels will actually start becoming competetive, and start to regulate each other's pricing.

This is all of course only going to happen this way if the Oil Companies don't take over all Ethanol production.  If they do that, they will just make E85 cost prohibitive, and thus support an unfair system.

#64 Dan M

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 09:41 AM

I'm getting kinda geeked up for this.  Michigan is very poorly represented in E-85 stations, but there are 2 Meijer stores within 2 miles of my home, one of which is just being now, and I'm keeping an eye out because since it is in construction, there will be no conversion costs for this being one of the 20 stores.  Something like this will have to happen before I can economically consider converting any vehicle or even continuing experimenting with mixes when the price disparity is only about 2% here at the station near me. 


You know Wyldkardde I started this site simply because I was ticked at the Oil Companies..and I strongly believe that E85 needs to be a true pricing alternative to Oil based fuels ..and whie I still feel tat way and am disappointe dthat the pricing gap has narrowed.. you know I  have to tell you I actually do feel good that I am denying OPEC funds everytime I fil my tank with E85 .

I think we should take care of the enviroment but I dont take those views to extreme ,I'm Patriotic..but again I am not an extremist isolationist buying only American products and I wont side with American patriotism over the truth .. but I do get a smug satisfaction filing up on E85 as if I am getting some revenge on  OPEC  ..

I could be irratable and grumpy and angry everytime I fill up on Unleaded knowing we are being screwed by some desert country that holds all the marbles ...  or I can fill up on E85 as is laughing back at them and showing them that they only think they hold all the marbles .. I dont have to play their game .. and that fills good !

I've come to discover that having that feeling is well worth a few extra pennies per gallon
..

I fully agree most people will not convert unless the pricing is there.. but it is interesting for me to see the change in myself just freeing myself at the pump from OPEC ..

It's an option thats available today for little cost compared to buying a hybrid or hydrogen or full electric cars


#65 Wyldkardde

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Posted 28 April 2006 - 07:30 AM

I'm getting kinda geeked up for this.  Michigan is very poorly represented in E-85 stations, but there are 2 Meijer stores within 2 miles of my home, one of which is just being now, and I'm keeping an eye out because since it is in construction, there will be no conversion costs for this being one of the 20 stores.  Something like this will have to happen before I can economically consider converting any vehicle or even continuing experimenting with mixes when the price disparity is only about 2% here at the station near me. 

#66 Dan M

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Posted 18 April 2006 - 09:31 AM


Meijer to sell ethanol blend
Fuel due soon at 20 locations

April 18, 2006

Email this Print this BY MICHAEL ELLIS

FREE PRESS BUSINESS WRITE

E85, which some view as automotive fuel of the future, will soon be available at about 20 Meijer stores in Michigan.

Meijer Inc. and General Motors Corp. will announce today, with Gov. Jennifer Granholm, plans to make the ethanol-gasoline blend E85 available at Meijer filling stations.

More than 4 million flexible-fuel vehicles on the road are capable of burning E85 or gasoline or a combination of the two. However, most owners fill up with regular gasoline because of a shortage of filling stations offering the fuel.

More than 4 million flexible-fuel vehicles on the road are capable of burning E85 or gasoline or a combination of the two. However, most owners fill up with regular gasoline because of a shortage of filling stations offering the fuel.

Only five stations in Michigan sell E85, a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline, reports the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition.

Some owners don't even realize that their vehicle is capable of running on E85.

Advocates of E85 tout the fuel as a made-in-America alternative to imported oil that also cuts dirty tailpipe emissions, boosts performance and helps farmers. Ethanol is a grain alcohol produced from crops like corn and soy.

Michigan is one of the nation's leading producers of corn, growing more than 257 million bushels a year.

The state has one ethanol plant in Caro that makes 45 million gallons a year, but four plants are due within two years. They will produce more than 200 million gallons of ethanol combined annually.

Meijer will work with GM and CleanFuel USA, which manufactures E85 fueling equipment, to identify which stores will sell E85. The trio is focusing on stores in Jackson, Lansing, Grand Rapids, Warren, Pontiac, Detroit, Rochester and Brighton.

"We're hoping to have several sites open by the end of 2006," Meijer spokeswoman Judith Clark said.

Detroit's automakers, battling to catch their Japanese competitors in selling hybrid gas-electric vehicles, are betting on ethanol to help boost their image. GM, which has more than 1.5 million flexible-fuel vehicles on the road, began running television and newspaper ads this year touting E85. GM also now identifies E85 vehicles with yellow fuel caps.

All passenger vehicles sold in the United States can use E10, a blend of 90% gasoline and 10% ethanol that is widely available.

Critics of E85 say it costs more to use. E85 often costs less at the pump than gas, but E85-powered vehicles typically get between 5% to 10% lower fuel mileage than cars that run on conventional gasoline.








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