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New Cummins Medium Duty Truck Engine Tuned for E85

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http://cumminsengines.com/cummins-ethos-28l-engine-demonstrates-50

 

CUMMINS ETHOS 2.8L ENGINE DEMONSTRATES 50 TO 80 PERCENT REDUCTION IN CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS

COLUMBUS, Indiana (July 14, 2014) – Today, Cummins Inc. (NYSE: CMI) announced the development of an engine and powertrain that reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by as much as 80 percent compared with a baseline gasoline-powered medium-duty truck. . .

 

The Cummins ETHOS 2.8L is designed specifically to use E-85, a clean-burning blend of 85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline. To take full advantage of the favorable combustion attributes and potential of E-85, the engine operates at diesel-like cylinder pressures and incorporates advanced spark-ignition technology. It delivers the power (up to 250 hp) and peak torque (up to 450 lb-ft) of gasoline and diesel engines nearly twice its 2.8-liter displacement . . .

 

Using corn-derived E-85, the high thermal efficiency and power-to-weight ratio of this engine results in 50 to 58 percent lower well-to-wheels CO2 emissions compared with the gasoline engine baseline. Using second-generation lignocellulosic-derived E-85, the powertrain’s efficiency features deliver an impressive 75 to 80 percent lower well-to-wheels CO2 emissions, depending on the drive cycle. . .

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Two questions, #1. Can that start/stop nonsense be left off and #2. Will it fit into a XJ Cherokee and mate up to an AW4 4-Speed automatic trans?

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These folks KNOW how to make quality engines...  I'd like to see them work out the technology with this engine, then develop a smaller engine to use in light trucks, vans, SUVs...  Since Cummins has long worked with Chrysler...  would be nice to have in the MiniVan, Dakota trucks and the Jeeps

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I was out checking out GM's new 5.3L Eco3 Engines, and found something I thought was kinda cool...

 

http://gmauthority.com/blog/gm/gm-engines/l83/

 

Apparently, this engine actually develops more HP and more Torque when running on E85.   It's compression ratio is 11:1, which makes me bet the MPG difference is better than you would normally expect.

 

I'm a Blue Oval guy, but if GM is going to make the vehicles like this, I'm going to really start considering a stroll into a dealership for my next purchase.

Edited by Wintermute

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When Cummins gets that ready for market- it might just be time to stroll on over to Columbus IN to pick up one for my Jeep LJ. :D

 

450 ft lbs of torque- 65 better than the same displacement block they developed for diesel- and while the HP is not listed for the diesel I am sure with the added torque and RPM the E85 allows- far greater HP. I would be able to put 35" tires on and not change from a 3.75 to 1 gear ratio to 4:28 like they do for gassers. Of course the axles just might break under the strain :lol:

 

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The Cummins E85 has proven the E85 engine can be highly competitive on a total cost of ownership basis and deliver 50% CO2 emission reduction. Their engine beat unleaded fuel mpg upon the medium duty delivery van tests and E85 is almost always cheaper. Seems like a win win for consumer and environment. Why wouldn't EPA attempt to hit this out of ballpark? Currently, we have set up E85 as a substitute fuel for unleaded gasoline, but the unleaded engine and transmission is physically unfit to unleash the efficiency of ethanol based fuels. Ethanol is well suited to diesel engine per findings of the ETHOS Ultra-Low Carbon Powertrain project. The E85 optimized engine was charted out at 42% max efficiency and usually above 40%. The 2.8 L engine designed per VOC or voice of consumer desires for torque, rpm, and Hp for the 24,000 GVW vans. The consumer wanted high torque at low Rpm. The delivery vans currently have two engine choices of heavy expensive 6.7L diesel long life or inexpensive 6 L unleaded short life. The diesel option has much more than needed low end torque and the unleaded choice has more than needed Hp at high rpm. The Optimized E85 engine better suited to delivery van needs than either of these engines with the durability of diesel. The E85 engine as compared to diesel is 700# lighter, cheaper to manufacturer, and easily meets strict California pollution standards with common catalytic technology. Interestingly, the optimum compression ratio for this application for E85 was 10:1 to 14:1 range. Also, unlike the needs of unleaded engine of hot spark plug to burn off soot deposits, E85 engine requires cooler plugs and has no soot fouling problems. E85 ignites at a lower temperature and should be specified with cooler plug range and gaped specifically for E85. The Cummins engine utilized iridium plugs. Because of fuel character of ethanol the engine never needed enrichment of fuel nor less than optimal ignition timing. The engine could have blasted past Hp generation of unleaded 6L engine, but Cummins decided to detune to keep intake temperature lower as the high engine rpm heated intake air to much through turbo. An intercooler could have solved the problem if needed. Also, the current engine does lose efficiency upon low Hp production, but this could be mitigated per the ethanol fuel's superior fuel character of lean burn and increase of EGR technology. Also, one must take note the emissions would decrease and performance increase per elimination of the unleaded fuel portion. Pure ethanol testing will display a substantial gain in Hp, torque, and lower emissions. After reading the success of the Cummins report, it does become apparent that if given half a chance by regulators the diesel engine manufactures would naturally double their engine offerings by the easy to modify task to E85 fuel. It wouldn't take that much. 

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